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Chef Jacoby Ponder’s Georgia Style Gumbo with Seared Blackened Red Snapper Recipe

Chef Ponder’s Georgia Style Gumbo With Seared Blacken Red Snapper Recipe.jpg

Put on your chef coats, you’re going to want to try this one!

Ingredients

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup oil/fat
  • 1 cup coarsely chopped celery
  • 1 large onion, coarsely chopped
  • 1 large green bell pepper, coarsely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 pound andouille sausage, sliced
  • 3 quarts water
  • 6 cubes chicken bouillon
  • salt to taste
  • 2 tablespoons hot pepper sauce (such as Tabasco(R)), or to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon Cajun seasoning, (Old Bay) or to taste
  • 4 bay leaves
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
  • 1 (14.5 ounce) can stewed tomatoes
  • 1 (6 ounce) can tomato sauce
  • 2 teaspoons gumbo file powder
  • 2 tablespoons bacon drippings
  • 2 (10 ounce) packages frozen cut okra, thawed
  • 1 pound lump crawfish meat
  • 3 pounds uncooked medium shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 teaspoons gumbo file powder

Directions

  1. Make a roux by whisking the flour and 3/4 cup Oil/Fat together in a large, heavy saucepan over medium-low heat to form a smooth mixture. Cook the roux, whisking constantly, until it turns a rich mahogany brown color. This can take 20 to 30 minutes; watch heat carefully and whisk constantly or roux will burn. Remove from heat; continue whisking until mixture stops cooking.
  2. Place the celery, onion, green bell pepper, and garlic into the work bowl of a food processor, and pulse until the vegetables are very finely chopped. Stir the vegetables into the roux, and mix in the sausage. Bring the mixture to a simmer over medium-low heat, and cook until vegetables are tender, 10 to 15 minutes. Remove from heat, and set aside.
  3. Bring the water and chicken bouillon cubes to a boil in a large Dutch oven or soup pot. Stir until the bouillon cubes dissolve, and whisk the roux mixture into the boiling water. Reduce heat to a simmer, and mix in the sugar, salt, hot pepper sauce, Cajun seasoning, bay leaves, thyme, stewed tomatoes, and tomato sauce. Simmer the soup over low heat for 1 hour; mix in 2 teaspoons of file gumbo powder at the 45-minute mark.
  4. Meanwhile, melt 2 tablespoons of bacon drippings in a skillet, and cook the okra with vinegar over medium heat for 15 minutes; remove okra with slotted spoon, and stir into the simmering gumbo. Mix in crawfish, shrimp, and Worcestershire sauce, and simmer until flavors have blended, 45 more minutes. Just before serving, stir in 2 more teaspoons of file gumbo powder.

Enjoy!

Jacoby Ponder - Chefuniforms.com February Chef of the Month_2016

February 2016 Chef of the Month – Jacoby Ponder, CC CPC

Jacoby Ponder - Chefuniforms.com February Chef of the Month_2016

After serving ten years in the U.S. Navy as a Personal and Private Chef, Chef Jacoby Ponder established FireSyde Chef & Co. in 2010. Ponder created FireSyde Chef to provide quality personal and private chef services to Hampton Roads, Virginia. He has received his extensive culinary arts and business management training at The Culinary Arts Institute of Virginia and ECPI University – graduating with both an Associates and Bachelors as a Private & Personal Chef.

With over a decade of experience in culinary arts, hospitality and business management, Ponder has acquired culinary skills to work in upscale environments. Ponder provides five-star meals for Admirals, foreign dignitaries, senior government executives, movie stars and celebrities alike. He has prepared dishes for names such as President George H. W. Bush, Bruce Willis, Vivica A. Fox, as well as reality television personalities on TLC’s “The SisterHood.” Ponder was a finalist on the Food Network hit show “Chopped”, where he placed as runner-up in the grueling Military Salute episode (Season 15, Episode 8) and now an uncontested win in September 2015 on Food Network’s latest and toughest hit series “CUTTHROAT KITCHEN.”

He is also very involved in his community and has been apart of the Virginia Beach Farmers Market (Featured Chef for Healthy Cooking and Wellness), Norfolk Public Schools (Chefs Move to School), Eat Fresh Buy Local (Featured Chef to Promote Buy Local Initiatives) and VA Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences (Cooking Matters).

Congratulations Chef Ponder on being our Chef of the Month for February!

 

Birthplace: Monroe, Ga.

Where do you work and where are you based?

I work for myself (Private and Personal Chef) for the Hampton Roads Area of Va.

I am also the owner of Norfolk Kitchen Lab in Norfolk Va. that just opened. Nestled in the heart of the River View Community ( Norfolk), the Norfolk Kitchen Lab is your new place to experience food excellence and Chefs at their absolute best. With 3 engagement platforms, all culinary enthusiasts can live out their kitchen aspirations in the following ways:
– By renting a standard fully equipped kitchen for food prep,
– By becoming a student of private cooking classes and learning the finer points in regards to nutrition and healthy eating, and
– By attending a monthly 7 course “Chefs round table”  meal to enjoy a display of unmatched skills of the Chefs & Staff.
With several ways to interact and entertain (not to mention the sole use of fresh produce grown in 4 neighboring greenhouses), the Norfolk Kitchen Lab stands to be the newest and most prolific addition to the downtown area.

What is your favorite kitchen tool in creating your masterpieces/dishes?

My favorite Kitchen tool is my knife! I love creating dishes from fresh and local grown ingredients.

What is your sharpest sense out of all the 5 senses?

My sense of smell!

What advice would you offer for aspiring chefs?

Don’t be afraid to take chances, and be adaptable to change.

What is one culinary tip every chef should know and perfect?

Be forever humble and also be a student of the Craft.

What does good food mean to you?

Good food to me means a dish that is well thought out and smells good! Also taste even better, to make one reminisce.

What trends do you see emerging in the near future?

Most certainly a trend is a marriage of fresh locally grown ingredients, I see the industry moving to an “Eat Fresh Buy Local” theme.

What features are important to you when selecting a Chef Coat? (Particular fabric, style, sleeve length, pockets)

Features like button styles, and fabric type like light fabrics that are flexible. Something that is urban and looks fashionable.

What is your go-to chef outfit?  Do you prefer coats, tees, pants, shorts, aprons, hats, etc.?

My go-to-outfit that I prefer would definitely be tees, pants and hats. I prefer Chef Jackets whenever I’m in a management capacity.

Favorite ingredient to work with?

My favorite ingredient(s) to work with are fresh herbs and spices. I feel that they dictate the flavor profile of the dish which is very important.

Favorite City to eat out in?

My favorite city to eat out in would have to be between San Francisco or San Diego, anywhere in the bay area!

Best Dish you have ever made?

The best dish I have ever made would have to be my famous Herb Crusted Salmon.

Place you eat most often on your days off?

I love to eat at this one place in Norfolk Va. – Todd Jurich Bistro…… They have the best truffle fries ever!

Person you would most like to cook for?

I would love to cook for …..Umm…I don’t know. I’ve already cooked for the President so, I’ll have to think more on this question….

What is new on your DVR?

The latest episode of Food Network show Chopped!

Knife Skills 101 with Chef Ace Champion

Ace Champion - Chefuniforms.com January Chef of the Month_2016

 

There are so many different knives.

Ever wondered if you are using the right knife? Are you aware of the purpose of each knife?

Below is a great summary explaining each knife and their use.

different-knives-and-their-uses_types

Different Knives and their Uses courtesy zbsharpening.com

Chef Champion’s Knife Skills 101

Chef Ace Champion shares some great lessons and techniques on how to use several knives such as Bread, Carving and Vegetable.

He even shows how to cut an onion, a few celery sticks and garlic cloves blindfolded! Very impressive! Check them out…

Knife Skills on Good Day Wisconsin Fox 11:

 

Blind Folded Knife Demonstration:

 

Knife Skills 101 Class at Cookscorner.com

 

What are your challenges when you use any knife?

Chef Ace Champion’s Na’ lands style Shrimp Etouffee Recipe

Chef Ace Champion's Na’ lands style Shrimp Etouffee - ChefUniforms.com Jan. 2016 Chef of the Month

Serves 8

Ingredients/Procedures:

6 ounces Salted Butter
4 ribs Celery – Bias cut/Asian cut or small diced
1/2 cup each Red and Green Bell Peppers – Small diced
1/2 cup Red onion – Small diced
4 cloves Garlic – Minced
1/4 cup plus 1 tbsp. Flour
1 lb Shrimp 31-40 count – Peeled, deveined, and season to taste
1/4 cup Tomato puree or Tomato Paste
2 tbsp Lemon juice – fresh squeezed
2 tbsp Slap Yo Mama Creole Seasoning – Season to taste or any Cajun seasoning
1 tbsp Louisiana Hot Sauce – To Taste
2 tsp Basil – Dry
2 tsp Thyme – Dry
1 tsp Chili powder – Dry
4 tbsp Parsley – Fresh/Minced
3 Green onions – Small Asian cut, white part removed
1 quart Shrimp stock or Chicken Broth
4 cups Cooked Rice – 1/2 cup per person

 

 Chef Ace Champion's Na’ lands style Shrimp Etouffee - ChefUniforms.com Jan. 2016 Chef of the Month

Directions:

1.    For the Stock. Using a medium size pot on medium heat, add the shells of the shrimp and set the shrimp aside in a bowl until ready to cook. Add in about 2 ½ quarts with the thyme, chili powder and basil and any leftover scraps from prepping your veggies. Cook uncover until reduced by half. Set aside until needed. This is your Shrimp Stock.
2.    Melt butter in large, heavy skillet or pot on a medium low heat. Add flour to make a white roux about 2 to 3 minutes on low/medium heat. Add celery, onions, bell pepper and garlic and sauté on low/medium heat for a few minutes. Add the tomato puree and mix well. Cook on the same temperature for an additional 5 minutes.
3.     Add ½ cup of stock to form a paste. Add in the lemon juice and seasonings with remaining stock to the pot. Stir and cook about 15 minutes on medium heat uncovered.
4.    Meanwhile in a medium skillet on medium-high heat, add 3 tablespoons of cooking oil. Allow the oil to get hot. Add drained shrimp to the pan and season with creole seasonings.
5.     Sauté shrimp until just turning pink (About 2 to 3 minutes). Deglaze the pan with a little water or wine and add the shrimp and its drippings back to the pot. Cover and simmer another 15 minutes. Stir in parsley and recover and remove from heat.

Note: If the Etouffee is too thick, thin it out with a little chicken broth or water. If it’s too thin, allow it to continue to cook until thick to your liking. It should have the constancy of a meat sauce.

Presentation:

Using a ladle, divide the Etouffee between 8 bowls.

Using a 4 ounce ice cream scooper, scoop a nice portion of rice directly in the center of the Etouffee.

Garnish with slivered green onions.

1.    For the Stock. Using a medium size pot on medium heat add the shells of the shrimp and set the shrimp aside in a bowl until ready to cook. Add in about 2 ½ quarts with the thyme, chili powder and basil and any leftover scraps from prepping your veggies. Cook uncover until reduced by half. Set aside until needed. This is your Shrimp Stock.
2.    Melt butter in large, heavy skillet or pot on a medium low heat. Add flour to make a white roux about 2 to 3 minutes on low/medium heat. Add celery, onions, bell pepper and garlic and sauté on low/medium heat for a few minutes. Add the tomato puree and mix well. Cook on the same temperature for an additional 5 minutes.
3.     Add ½ cup of stock to form a paste. Add in the lemon juice and seasonings with remaining stock to the pot. Stir and cook about 15 minutes on medium heat uncovered.
4.    Meanwhile in a medium skillet on medium-high heat add 3 tablespoon of cooking oil. Allow the oil to get hot. Add drained shrimp to the pan and season with creole season
5.     Sauté shrimp until just tuning pink. (About 2 to 3 minutes). Deglaze the pan with a little water or wine and add the shrimp and its drippings back to the pot. Cover and simmer another 15 minutes. Stir in parsley and, recover, and remove from heat.

Note: If the Etouffee is too thick, thin it out with a little chicken broth or water. If it’s too thin, allow it to continue to cook until thick to your liking. It should have the constancy of a meat sauce.

Presentation:

Using a ladle divide the Etouffee between 8 bowls.

Using a 4 ounce ice cream scooper, scoop a nice portion of rice directly in the center of the Etouffee.

Garnish with slivered green onions.

Voila! Bon Apetit!

Chef Ace Champion’s Chocolate Bourbon Pecan Pie with White Chocolate Ganache Drizzle Recipe

Chef Ace Champion's Chocolate Bourbon Pecan Pie with a White Chocolate Drizzle - ChefUniforms.com Jan. 2016 Chef of the Month

Make 1 pie for 8 slice servings

For the Pie:

3 large eggs

1 Cup Dark Brown Sugar – packed

1 Cup Light Corn Syrup

3 tablespoons Southern Comfort – 3 ounces

2 tablespoons Real Butter

1 tablespoon Heavy Whipping Cream – optional

1 teaspoon Vanilla Extract

1 tablespoon All-Purpose Flour

1 teaspoon/a pinch of Salt – Kosher or any Table Salt

1 – 1 1/2 Cups Pecan Halves – Ruff Chopped

3/4 Cup Chocolate Chips – Semi-sweet baking chips/half way melted

1 Pre-Made Pie Shell – to fit a 9″ deep dish pie plate

 

For the Drizzle:

1 teaspoon Southern Comfort – optional

8 ounces White Chocolate – melted

1 tablespoon Cream – for the right consistency

1 teaspoon Dark Brown Sugar

 

Directions for the Chocolate Bourbon Pecan Pie

  • Roll pre-made pie shell to fit a 9-in. deep-dish pie plate.
  • Transfer pastry to pie plate; trim to 1/2 inch, beyond edge of plate and flute edges.
  • Par- bake the pie shells for 10 minutes on 325 degrees then remove from oven and cool.
  • In a large bowl, beat the eggs, brown sugar, corn syrups, bourbon, butter and salt until blended.
  • Fold in 1 cup pecans and 1/2 cup chocolate chips.
  • Pour filling into crust; sprinkle with remaining pecans and chocolate chips.
  • Bake at 325° for about 1 hour & 15 minutes or until crust is golden brown and filling is puffed and set.
  • Cool completely on a wire rack.
  • Allow the pie to rest for at least 2 hours before cutting.
  • This is a great make a day ahead pie!

 

Directions for the White Chocolate Ganache

  • In a double broiler, add the cream and Southern Comfort and allow cooking for about 2 minutes on a steady medium high heat.
  • Add the chocolate chips in a few at a time to allow them to melt nicely with the cream and whiskey.
  • Cook until all chocolate is melted and you have a smooth consistency in your sauce.
  • Note if the sauce is to light, add more chips and if it’s too thick, line it out with a little cream or whiskey.

Presentation: Place a slice of pie on a small plate and top with pecans and drizzle.

Enjoy this delicious dessert!

Chef Ace Champion’s Pork Tenderloin with a Mushroom Port Wine Butter Sauce Recipe

Pork Tenderloin with a Mushroom Port Wine Butter Sauce Recipe courtesy Chef Ace Champion - Chefuniforms.com January 2016 Chef of the MonthChef Ace Champion, our January 2016 Chef of the Month was the Grand place winner in the Minnesota Flavor Pitch Recipe Competition with his dish: Marinated Pork Tenderloin seared in Avocado Oil with a Wild Mushroom and Port Wine Butter Reductions Sauce. Below is the recipe instructions and also a video for you to learn from Chef Champion himself!

Ingredients

Marinated Tenderloin

Boneless Tenderloin – 2 lbs – Cleaned and trimmed or already marinated
Rosemary – 1 tablespoon – Fresh
Italian Vinaigrette – 1/2 Cup – Robust Italian Dressing/Wishbone
Fresh Garlic – 3 cloves – Minced
Avocado Oil – 1 tablespoon – Almost any oil will work but I recommend Canola Oil
Creole Seasoning – To taste/about 1 to 2 table – You can also season this roast with salt & pepper. Season as you would a normal roast.

 

Port Wine Sauce

Brandy – 1/4 Cup – Or any kind of dark rum
Portabella Mushrooms – 1 Cup – Sliced or Quartered
Shallot – 1 Large – Diced
Port Wine – 2 Cups – Reduced by 50%
Butter – 8 Ounces – Real Butter
Beef Stock/Broth – 2 Cups – Reduce by 50%
Heavy Whipping Cream – 1/4 Cup
Fresh Parsley – 1 tablespoon – Chopped fine

 

Directions
Tenderloin:

Clean and trim tenderloin.

Season tenderloin with creole seasoning, rosemary, garlic and mix well.

Let it sit for about 15 minutes so the spices can absorb into the meat.

Place the tenderloin and the Italian Vinaigrette in a zip lock bag and close tightly so that no air can escape. This will speed up the marinating process.

Refrigerate for at least 4 hours or overnight.

In a medium size skillet, add the oil and allow to get hot on a medium to high head.

Note: Before you add the tenderloin into a hot skillet make sure all the tenderloin is semi-dry from the marinate. This will insure a good sear. Add the tenderloin and sear on all sides making sure there is a caramel like glaze covering the whole loin. Remove from heat and finish cooking in the oven at about 300 degrees for about 40 minutes or until the loin is done, (about 145 degrees). Remove from oven and allow the loin to rest. This will keep the juices inside.

Sauce:

Using the same pan you seared the tenderloin in, turn the stove top on a medium heat.

When hot, add the shallot and mushrooms and saute for about 1 minute. You are just looking to (sweet the veggies) which means lightly saute.

De glaze the pan with the brandy by tilting your skillet away from you and add the brandy tilt toward the flame and ignite (flambé), making sure to scrape up all that was left behind from the tenderloin.

Add the wine and reduce by about half, then add the beef stock and reduce by half.

Add your cream and cook for about 2 minutes.

Turn your stove on low and add the butter making so it is stirred consistently and is cooking very slow. This will keep the butter from breaking.

Plating:

Slice the tenderloin in 1-inch medallions and arrange on the plate making sure to overlap each one in a fan like shape. Spoon the hot wine sauce over the loin and sprinkle with parsley.

Bon Apetit!

Ace Champion - Chefuniforms.com January Chef of the Month_2016

January 2016 Chef of the Month – Ace Champion

Ace Champion - Chefuniforms.com January Chef of the Month_2016Chef Champion comes from the great food state of Louisiana.

He specializes in Cajun/Creole, the taste of New Orleans.

He has over 18 years of culinary experience ranging from Certified Meat Cutter, Executive Chef, Event Coordinator, Personal Chef, as well as Cooking Class Instructor.

He is also an honors Culinary Arts graduate of Fox Valley Technical College, one of the nation’s premiere culinary schools.

Chef Champion cooks with a strong passion and makes it a priority to visualize his entrees while preparing them, so in turn… he can empower others who struggle with cooking. Chef Champion infuses cultures and ingredients to create a flavor that gives you a champion cooking experience and the know-how to cook a little appeal yourself!

The Law of Attraction & the Power of Positive Thinking are the cornerstone of Chef Champion’s passion for food. He believes that if you think you can be a great chef or cook, then you will realize it, but if you think you won’t be a great chef or cook, then you probably won’t hit the mark. Chef Champion believes that before you hit the kitchen, focus on what you want. The result? You’ll serve up a great dish almost every time!

That’s why Chef Champion created, 8 steps to Your Perfect Meal, a simple plan to help viewers or readers (available in book format, too) be more positive in the kitchen on their way to greater productivity and creativity. “I now understand my purpose in life and that is to teach the world everything I can about food for the mind, body, and soul,” concludes Chef Champion.

Congratulations Chef Champion on being our Chef of the Month for January!

Birthplace: I was born in the bay area of California where I spent most of my childhood. I was then further raised in Louisiana where my try heritage is.

Where do you work and where are you based? I own my own business “Chef Champion LLC.” In my business I am a Private Chef, Culinary Instructor both private & public, Visionary Motivational Speaker as well as a Menu & Recipe Developer for local restaurants and private companies.

What is your favorite kitchen tool in creating your masterpieces/dishes? Hands down my 8” Wusthof Chef Knife. There is not much I can’t do with this knife. When I hold this tool, it feels like an extension of my body which allows me to create in detail.

What is your sharpest sense out of all the 5 senses? I would say what I call the 6th sense. To me this is when I can manipulate my conscious mind to flow freely with my conscious mind to view all senses as one. This allows me to use my senses in creation without acknowledging the use of them. If I had to pick one though, it would be my sight. This is where I can learn and see. My sight allows me to turn my vision into reality on a plate.

 

What advice would you offer for aspiring chefs? Never give up on your dreams. Albert Einstein said it best when asked how are you so smart he replied and said “It’s not that I’m so smart it’s just that I stay with problems longer than most people.” This lets me know when chasing my dreams no matter how hard or how long it takes, I will get there if I don’t give up. Be true to yourself and what you believe in.

What is one culinary tip every chef should know and perfect? Every chef should master the art of visualization. It is a necessity to have a clear vision of what’s to come before it happens. This will allow you to always be 2 to 3 steps ahead of yourself. The proper technique is called “Visual Motor Rehearsal.” This means one would visualize a recipe or an event inside their mind. This works as a form of practice without having to lift a finger. You can find more tips on this topic and other cooking tips in my book “8 Steps To Your Perfect Meal.

What does good food mean to you? Good food means food that looks good, taste good, and does good things once it’s inside my body. Food should be good for the mind, body, and soul. I also view good food as that is live and raised properly. My motto is cooking with live foods. That means in one way or another, the food we eat was once alive.

What trends do you see emerging in the near future? The power of positive thinking. I see an awakening of the mind of chefs and people all over the world to trust in there inner souls and become who they want to be. I see cooking changing from the sometimes negative to being fun, exciting and healing.

 

What features are important to you when selecting a Chef Coat? (Particular fabric, style, sleeve length, pockets) My personal favorite is the long sleeve. I feel this is the more elegant professional look I am going for. I also enjoy all of the color selections you can get at ChefUniforms.com. This allows me to keep my image sharp and unique. I also love the mesh coats. Being a celebrity chef I cannot afford to not look professional on camera. They have an excellent selection of mesh chef coats for men and women.

What is your go-to chef outfit?  Do you prefer coats, tees, pants, shorts, aprons, hats, etc? I don’t have a specific one. I have 4 branches of my business that require a certain type of coat. For instance when I speak, I where a heavier longer coat. When I am cooking, I use a mesh coat and when I am outdoors in the summer, I use my short sleeve mesh coats.

 

Favorite ingredient to work with? Anything fresh. If I had to pick one, I would choose garlic. I think this is an ingredient that should be added to all savory dishes. I also love the health benefits. I have high blood pressure and eating lots of this delicious herb helps me regulate my pressure.

Favorite City to eat out in? New Orleans. I have never been to a city with as big as a variety of fresh homemade food. This city definitely brings out the flavor.

Best Dish you have ever made? I would say my Cherry Apple Pie with a Caramel Moscato Rum Sauce. What makes this dish so good and unique is instead of mixing the apples and cherries, I  separate the recipes, then layer them together separating them with cream cheese and topping this off with my homemade caramel rum sauce. The layers of flavor excites any taste buds.

Place you eat most often on your days off? At my home. This is where I can relax, create and enjoy my family.

Person you would most like to cook for? Most definitely Jesus Christ. I can see the image of him eating at the last supper wondering what chef had the honor to cook for him. I hope one day I will.

 

Decadent Hors d’Oeuvres to Ring in the New Year

With New Year’s Eve just two days away, it’s time to start thinking (if you haven’t already) about what you’ll be preparing for the evening’s festivities.

Aside from the typical cheese, crackers, dips, and shrimp cocktail (though you shouldn’t discount a good shrimp cocktail), we’ve compiled a short list of decadent hors d’oeuvres to enjoy while ringing in the New Year.

Bacon Wrapped Dates Stuffed with Blue Cheese

Bacon Wrapped Dates Stuffed with Blue Cheese

I can’t even imagine a better trio of flavors, and they’re all in one bite!

Mouth-Watering Stuffed Mushrooms

Mouth-Watering Stuffed Mushrooms

Stuffed Mushrooms are a staple at my house, and these look too good to pass up!

Baked Brie Cups

Baked Brie Cups

I love a good baked brie, but it’s not something you can hold while walking around and talking to people… until now!

Sweet and Spicy Sriracha Meatballs

Sweet and Spicy Sriracha Meatballs

Sriracha meatballs? Count me in!

Twice-Cooked Potatoes with Caviar

Twice-Cooked Potatoes with Caviar

Nothing says New Year’s Eve like Champagne! And what goes perfectly with Champagne? Caviar.

Ham and Gruyere Thumbprints

Ham and Gruyere Thumbprints

The perfect party appetizer. It’s portable, it’s clean, it’s delicious!

Steamed Ricotta Dumplings

Steamed Ricotta Dumplings

Ricotta Cheese? Yes please! Steamed dumpling? Now that’s something!

Lobster Crostini

Lobster Crostini

Another perfect complement to go along with your Champagne. These are sure to be a hit at any event.

Apple-Nut Blue Cheese Tartlets

Apple-Nut Blue Cheese Tartlets

Don’t these sound delicious? I can just imagine the salty, sweet flavors right now, and it’s making me hungry!

Pepper Poppers

Pepper Poppers

Finally, something for us spice lovers. With three different kinds of cheese and bacon, how can you go wrong?

We would like to wish you a very Happy New Year, from all of us here at ChefUniforms.com!

Chef William Werner’s Strawberry Rhubarb Creole Shrubb Pate De Fruit Recipe

Strawberry Rhubarb Creole Shrubb Pate De Fruit - Chefuniforms.com December Chef of the Month William Werner

Another great recipe from Chef William Werner for the Holidays!

Ingredients

Demera Sugar    250g

Creole Shrubb    24g

 

Method:

1. In a medium mixing bowl add liquor and scraped vanilla bean to demera sugar and stir to combine.

2. The sugar should be wet but not dissolved.

3. For best results, place in a dehydrator overnight, or on a silpat lined sheet pan in your oven on the lowest setting

4. With the door cracked open.

5. Sugar is done when dry and crunchy. Break up into small pieces and store in a airtight container.

How to Choose the Right Chef Coat and Fit?

Some people love to shop, others not so much. There are those people who like to browse, compare options and pick based on what catches their eye. If you are anything like us however, you come with a vision, you know what you want and where to find it and your goal is to be in and out in record time. That becomes difficult if you can’t navigate your way around a website or you are unsure what the best choice for you is. The ChefUniforms.com website was set up to be quite simple in order to help our customers get the best shopping experience possible. Here are some tips on how to filter selections to help choose the perfect coat, whether you are buying for yourself or for your entire staff.

Most people will enter the site and just click on the coat tab and have the option of viewing all available coats. Simple right? Except now you may be looking through hundred of things you are not interested in and this can become very time consuming. If you want something specific, the best way to filter through all the things you don’t need is to hover over the coat tab instead of clicking on it. By doing this, you have the option to filter your selections by Style, Fit, Look, Gender, Fabric, Sleeve Length and even Type of Buttons (see below).

How to Choose the Right Chef Coat and Fit with Chefuniforms.com_Coat Tab

 

  1. Shopping by style is much easier with our drop down menu. Under style you can shop for specific characteristics of the coat. For example, you can search for coats that have mesh, or color block. If you want to only see printed coats, you can do that too with only a couple of clicks.
  2. Choosing the right fit is simpler than you thought. If you are searching by fit on our site you will find that there are 2 types of fit, Tailored and Basic. The Tailored fit is a slimmer, contoured fit. This type of fit is engineered to fit closer to the body and embrace its curves. If you prefer a looser fit with some extra room, then the Basic fit is perfect for you. The Basic fit is a roomier fit, which allows for a more casual look.
  3. If you like a specific fabric, you can always search by available fabrics. As part of the menu drop down, you can see all our Poly/Cotton Twill coats or all our Egyptian cotton coats in one place. This way you never have to click on multiple styles to find out what fabric it’s made from.
  4. Want to only see coats that apply to you? You also have the option of searching by gender. This allows you to look at all available male or female items at once.
  5. Have a particular sleeve length favorite? Now you can also filter by your preferred sleeve length.
  6. Pick your closure.If you prefer snaps to buttons or fabric covered to plastic, we can help with that too. The drop down lets you filter our products so you are viewing only the items that have the type of closure you are looking for.
  7. Last but not least, you can always use our QUICK LINKS to search our new arrivals, on sale and Plus Size styles. The quick links also allow you to look at our Uncommon Threads selection.

 

QUICK TIPS

What’s your fit? Basic vs. Tailored

The idea of the Basic fit is that it is roomier and boxier. If you like to have some extra room in your coat then the Basic fit is right for you. However, if you prefer a more fitted, shape-driven fit, then you want to choose the Tailored fit.

How to Choose the Right Chef Coat and Fit with Chefuniforms.com_Basic & Tailored Fit

Pick your look- Traditional vs. Modern

Now that you know which fit is best for you, pick your look. Picking a look can be quite simple if you know what you like. You can keep it simple with our wide selection of traditional double-breasted solid color coats. Or you can spice it up a bit and choose a more modern look like an asymmetrical, printed or color block coat.

How to Choose the Right Chef Coat and Fit with Chefuniforms.com_Modern & Traditional Fit

What’s the best fit for your kitchen?

Whether you are buying for yourself or your entire staff, sometimes the type of kitchen or establishment you work in has a big influence in your choice of styles you buy. For example if you work in an exceptionally hot kitchen, the best styles for you may be our lightweight styles. There are several lightweight and mesh combination styles that provide better breathability and comfort in higher temperatures. Mesh panels offer the ability to keep you cooler and dryer through the day.

For higher-end restaurants, you can’t go wrong with our Egyptian Cotton selection. This is a luxurious selection and is available in modern and traditional styles.

If you are looking for the best in front of the house styles, then consider our Versa shirt. We offer a selection of front of the house styles on our ChefUniforms.com website. In addition there are also plenty of options to choose from on our Uniform Difference site, which you can find a link to at the top right corner of the ChefUniforms.com site, or simple go to www.uniformdifference.com.

How to Choose the Right Chef Coat and Fit with Chefuniforms.com_Versa Shirts

When it comes to running a business, faces will come and go. If you know you have a high turnover, or simply want to make sure you can keep the same look for an extended period, consider buying our classic styles. Classic styles are available through the end of 2016. This guarantees that the styles you purchase today will be available to you for at least 1 more year. This is the simplest and easiest way to keep your staff looking consistent.

These are just some tips to keep in mind when you offer us the pleasure of your business. Styles on our website, as well as our catalog, have signs that can help you quickly identify between lightweight, Egyptian cotton, stretch styles, classic styles or mesh styles. So remember when in doubt…follow the signs.

How to Choose the Right Chef Coat and Fit with Chefuniforms.com_Follow the Signs

Put Us to Work! We will be delighted to find out more about your company and how you envision outfitting your team! If you would like one of our Account Reps to contact you, please visit our Group Order Form.

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