A Chef and His Coat: The Perfect Pair

womens_coats

The chef coats that we know today are incredibly diverse and come in a myriad of patterns, cuts, colors, styles, and fabrics. While some chefs prefer to keep it more on the traditional side with a white coat, others like to add some spice in their wardrobe with bright colors. Fortunately, this wide range of options means that chefs can truly personalize their coats to fit their personal preferences and styles in the kitchen. For example, Chef Anish Rana, our June Chef of the Month, enjoys Poly Cotton mix and short sleeves: “Poly Cotton Mix – kitchen friendly material. I am a very hands on chef and work behind the line. I like to wear short sleeves. When they started making short sleeves, I was in heaven!” Other chefs, such as Chef Jenn Louis, prefer a more relaxed look, such as sporting a t-shirt with an apron accompanied by Dickies pants and clogs.

54318_HPBLAIn recent years, modern chefs take their everyday cosmopolitan, fashionable look and carry it into the kitchen. Many young, up-and-coming chefs show urban influences in their wardrobe with edgy cuts inspired by the runway and pop culture. A very popular color aside from the classic white is black, which gives chefs a modern, urban appeal. Skulls have even become a popular pattern for chefs to sport in the kitchen! Whatever your preference for uniform style and comfort may be, Chef Uniforms has a wealth of options to showcase your passion and creativity in your workplace!

Here are some historical facts found on Wikipedia about the chef coat and how its iconic image came about!

 

History

  • 165311_white6th century: Along with other artisans and free-thinkers in Europe, chefs faced persecution which forced them to seek refuge in monasteries where they adopted the clothing of the monks, such as toques (now known as “chef hats”) in order to fit in. Different heights of toques indicate rank within the kitchen – for example, the chef would have the tallest toque.
  • 19th century: Chef Marie-Antoine Carême redesigned chef uniforms in white to exude professionalism and cleanliness. During this same period, the chef and his staff began to wear double-breasted coats as another way to promote safety in the kitchen. This look stuck and is now the traditional garb we are familiar with today.

 

Features Chefs Love

Offering protection, durability, and functionality, chef coats are designed with these benefits in mind for their profession. Seemingly simple and sleek, the chef coats we are all familiar with today are designed with intricate detail and thought.

  • mens_coatsThe double-breasted look on chef coats was created so that chefs could simply reverse this double-breasted feature and maintain the look of cleanliness in the event that a spill were to happen on their coat.
  • The cloth buttons on the chef coat endure frequent washes and bleaches as well as the everyday wear-and-tear in the kitchen.
  • Chef coats are both insulating and heat protective – a true necessity.
  • Light, Textured Fabrics that include Mesh panels
  • Sleeves of varying lengths – long and short
  • Egyptian cotton is exclusively grown in Egypt (hence the name) and is known as the finest cotton in the world. This makes it a very popular for chefs who appreciate its strong yet soft fabric and high quality fibers. This reputation has put Egyptian cotton at the forefront for the past century-and-a-half as the highest lint quality available amongst world cottons.

As the culinary industry continues to grow, uniform designers like Chef Uniforms do their best to stay well-informed and design practical, comfortable, and fashionable coats that evolve with your profession and personal cooking style.

 Are there any styles or trends that you see emerging and would love to have? We are always open to ideas!

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