Tag Archives: Anthony Hunt

Chef Anthony’s Tomato Recipe

Our final recipe from our October Chef of the Month, Anthony Hunt is his tomato recipe. This recipe can be used for party appetizers but it is also very versatile.  Enjoy!

tomatoes with dish.jpg

Confi of garlic and tomato spread

Ingredients:

16 ounces cherry tomatoes
15 cloves of garlic or less.
Bay leaves 3 whole dry or fresh
6 leaves of Basil fresh

Directions:

Submerge ingredients in olive oil
Bake with aluminum foil for one and a half hours.
Allow time to cool.

Remove ingredients from oil. Rooftop ingredients to drain off excess liquid. Add salt, pepper, and olive oil finish with chopped fresh basil.

Best served on sliced toasted baguette. As a final finish, add a sliver of fresh parmesan.

A big thank you to Chef Anthony for providing these awesome recipes and being our October Chef of the Month!

Chef Anthony Hunt’s Top Fishing Techniques

anthony-smile-with-bait

Typically, our chef of the month provides three recipes. However, this month we are switching it up a bit. After speaking with our October Chef of the Month, Anthony Hunt we quickly realized his love and passion for fishing. Chef Anthony or maybe we should say Fisherman Anthony has finished top 10 in 7 tournaments, fished over 48 events, and his largest catch was over 24 pounds! You can see more of his fishing success stories here.

We got to talking about his fishing techniques and competitions and decided it would be great if he provided us with a fishing recipe for success. So this week our October Chef of the Month explains and gives us a few fishing pointers! Enjoy!

Flipping and pitching are some of my favorite techniques to do while competing at the National FLW (Fishing League Worldwide) Tournament circuit.

Here is the gear I use to do this very skilled technique:

Okuma TCS Rod and Reel Mat Daddy 7’6 with a Helios Air 7:3.1

Reel. 1.5 Pro Tungsten

Mustad pen grip flipping hooks

Fished on 65-pound Test Smackdown Seaguar Braid

Favorite plastic bait to use is Gary Yamamoto Flappin Hog in Black and Blue Fleck

Some information and direction on flipping and pitching:

Flipping involves peeling off about 50 to 75 percent or more line than the length of the rod and simply feeding the line back through the guides as you drop and lift the rod.

Pitching involves releasing the lure from your hand with an underhand pitching movement as you let the line feed through the guides while you thumb the spool.

Pitching and flipping are lure specific ways to fish. By that I mean there are only a few types of bait that are used with these techniques which also dictates the types of cover we fish.For example, you can pitch a slow, stationary bait such as a jig or worm, or you can pitch a faster-moving bait such as a spinnerbait.

Flipping the bait is usually only done with a stationary type bait, whether it is plastic or pork. By the way, it is not recommended to pitch crankbaits.Of course, when pitching or flipping, you will want to use as light a bait as possible, so you do not spook the fish.

Worms with a 1/8-ounce weight pegged or 3/16- to 1/ 4-ounce jigs with pork trailers should be the ticket in shallow water.Jigs and worms with up to a 1-ounce weight may be necessary to penetrate thick weeds such as hydrilla.

Now go catch some fish!

OCTOBER 2016 CHEF OF THE MONTH ANTHONY HUNT

We are excited to announce our Chef of the Month for October is: Anthony Hunt!  See what Anthony is all about below and look out for his awesome recipes to come throughout the month!

Where were you born?anthony-face-with-bait

I was born in Laurel, Delaware.

Where do you work and where are you based?

I currently work at Yolo Restaurant in Fort Lauderdale, as a corporate pastry chef and works for the restaurant people (group).

What is your favorite kitchen tool in creating your masterpieces/dishes?

The Sous-Vide cooking immersion cooker.  It slowly cooks to keep the flavor locked inside. It doesn’t have an effect on the texture and keeps the food moist.

What is your sharpest sense out of all the 5 senses?

Taste. Some of your senses intertwine with each other. But I always try to taste as much as I can. I hated mango and cilantro because my taste buds did not understand it. After tasting it over and over I could finally understand the beauty in the flavors. I look for something different than what I pick up the first time.

What advice would you offer for aspiring chefs?

Do something else. Be a teacher or be a chef only if this is something that is in your heart.  It is not a fly by night career, you have to really love it. Sometimes you may not figure that out right away. It takes time maybe 10 years after you start your career, then you’ll find out whether you aren’t into it or you’ll really love it. I was following my brother in the industry and I didn’t think I had it. I watched him fall out and I found that I really had a knack for it. Make sure you love cooking, pastries, and people – everything that is in the industry.

What is one culinary tip every chef should know and perfect?

How to make an egg. The simple foundation in culinary is worth that if you can’t make an egg, he/she probably can’t boil a hot dog or make a steak. Knowing how to make a good scrambled egg is paying attention to the coagulation and the residual heat otherwise it will kill your egg every time.

What does good food mean to you?

Something you experience and taste. You can give the most expensive wagyu or whatever but I can taste the person’s passion in their food.

What trends do you see emerging in the near future?

Super-foods are taking over. Quinoa evolving kale and kale pesto alongside hearty greens and spinach. Healthier trends will evolve into the restaurant side and the heavy sauces will disappear, it’s happening already.

What features are important to you when selecting a Chef Coat? (particular fabric, style, sleeve length, pockets).

For me a few things make good qualities in a chef coat. Egyptian cotton is a fabric I have grown to love over the years because its lighter. Having mobility is important you want to be able to stretch and make sure it’s not pulling on you. I shouldn’t have to put pounds of starch on it, I also like breathing holes. Dressing as a chef now is at its coolest point ever. We are not the traditional tall hat guys anymore; the style is a lot looser now.

What is your go-to chef outfit? Do you prefer coats, tees, pants, shorts, aprons, hats, etc?

A custom chef coat that looks like every day clothes. How cool and breathable the jacket is. A pair of jeans and clogs. Then top it off with a cool apron and baseball cap and an old school Buff fishing bandanna, I have a mop head.

Favorite ingredient to work with?

I get excited about fish.  Especially fish that is caught by me. I love the freshness of fish – it cannot touch water, must be on ice and cooked the same day. Saltwater fish only. My favorite fish is flounder.

Favorite City to dine out in?

I am going to have to say Miami. I really like The Federal Restaurant, my friend is the owner.

Best Dish you have ever made?

I think it is a mojo pork belly with a cilantro key lime pie filling custard. Crispy curry lentils succotash grits cheesy grits and corn chutes (micro corn chute).

Place you eat most often on your days off?

Probably at the S3 restaurant. I really like the fresh sushi options and they have one of the best macaroni and cheese in the world.

Who is the person you would like to cook for the most?

My mom.  I haven’t cooked for my mom yet. I have been cooking for a long time, over 20 years. I have also been away from my mom for 20 years. Every time I go home my brother cooks so I haven’t had the chance to cook for my mother.

What made you decide to become a chef?

I kind of needed to pay for fishing. Fishing was the priority I never knew I would be in the chef industry this long. It took 10 years to learn that I loved it. I started to realize how many contrasts and textures flavors there are. The creativity and the artsy flow of cooking was the main force and reason, outside of wanting to compete and beat my brother.  The creative process is what I really love. I am at a point in my chef career where I don’t pull from other chefs anymore I pull from my own palate.

What is new on your DVR?

My episode of my food network chopped.  Episode 26 season 5 desserts.

 

 

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