Tag Archives: Chef Brian Rutherford

The Top tools for every professional Chef

Chef in kitchen on blog.chefuniforms.comHave you ever heard the saying “A Tool is only as good as the person using it?”

Every professional chef has their favorites that they just can’t live without! They will use these items over and over even when it’s falling apart or broken, until they are like, “okay, I have to replace them now!”

From all of our Chef of the Month interviews this year, one of our questions asked was “what is your must have kitchen tool for professional chefs?”

Here’s the list of their “must haves” that made our Chefs of the Month celebrated for what they do in the kitchen:

Chef Ron Duprat – Thermal Circulating Bath. It enhances the flavor, texture and aroma of dishes.

Chef George Duran – Pickle Picker. It is a device that has 3 prongs and so easy to use to get those must have pickles! I love the name and it is a tool that not everyone has.

Chef Jenn Louis – Bob Kramer’s Knife. “Bob Kramer lives in Olympia, Washington. He’s one of the only guys in the US who makes handcrafted knives of really high quality. (He has an interest in samurai sword-making and has made a few.) I met him at the Food & Wine Classic in Aspen in 2011. I told him I’d been wait-listed for years and that it was my birthday, and he made me a workhorse steel knife. He takes many, many layers of metal and puts them in a 2,300-degree kiln. His skill level is just phenomenal.”

Chef Brian Rutherford – Japanese Mandolin. It is a versatile veggie cutter and it cuts vegetables very thin and very fine like a julienne cut (cutting into long, thin strips, like matchsticks) and batonnet cut (another type of long strips).

Chef Anish Rana – Knives! I love Wüsthof knives which is a German brand.

Chef Jason Connelly – Spoons. I love my spoons like Banquet Spoons. They are versatile and can use them on fish and veggies and saucing.

Chef Lorenzo Boni – French Made Cast Iron Dutch Oven – I love the way it is designed and it cooks so easily and the food comes out great!

Chef Robyn Almodovar – Spoon. A nice tablespoon.

Chef Charlise JohnsonKitchenAid Mixer – they are so amazing. I make all kinds of things with it like dinner rolls and cupcakes. It makes life so much easier.

Chef Andrea Litvin – A Scale – I must know exact measurements down to the gram!

Chef Lisa Nakamura – A great pair of Knives – you can do anything with them. I like the brand, Global because they are easy to sharpen and maintain.

Chef Carlos Gaytan – Vitamix Blender. I can do many things with it like sorbets and purees.

Chef in kitchen on blog.chefuniforms.com

Professional Chef Knives seem to be the leading choice…..

We would like to know what are your favorites that you cannot absolutely live without in your kitchen?

 

Chef Brian Rutherford – Teacher and Mentor at Sheridan Technical Center

Chef Brian Rutherford on blog.chefuniforms.comChef Rutherford is humble, down to earth and very personable. He has been a Chef Instructor for the past few years teaching his craft to young culinary students at Sheridan Technical Center (STC) in Hollywood, Florida. His focus has changed dramatically from being an Executive Chef to training the future chefs of tomorrow, something he is passionate about and shares his experience and wisdom with them. It has always been a dream of his after realizing how important the culinary school experience played a role in his own career path.

 

About Sheridan Technical Center
In 1968, STC opened its doors in Hollywood, Florida. Sheridan is the oldest of Broward County’s three technical centers. As a Broward County Public School, STC offers postsecondary workforce development programs affording students the opportunity to gain skills in high wage, high demand occupational fields and compete successfully in the local employment marketplace. STC provides students full or part time training using the latest industry-approved technology and equipment. Their instructors are licensed and certified teaching professionals. To meet the needs of students preparing for occupations, 45 workforce development programs are offered, including 3 applied technology diploma programs and 42 vocational certificate programs.

What education or experience would you recommend for aspiring chefs?
Chef Rutherford highly recommends going to a Technical School like Sheridan Technical Center once students are contemplating on choosing a culinary career as a chef. Starting with an apprentice program using the format he teaches at STC, the students can understand the basics through a short program and learn and get hands on experience and learn a lot of different techniques and styles of the culinary profession and practice what they learn. It is inexpensive, they build a good foundation with the basics and they also eat what is cooked getting exposure to casual and formal culinary styles. As part of the curriculum, he teaches his students in 3 courses: food handling and servsafe practices, culinary nutrition and management. They spend 30 hours a term for each class.

“Experience is the best teacher and it is the little things that they will pick up from being hands-on and experimental that theory cannot teach them.” Once they decide to pursue being a chef, then he recommends going to work for a restaurant. He would not recommend working for a restaurant only as they will only learn one or two specific specialties depending on what the restaurant’s niche is. In addition to learning the technical skills, he guides them to learn to be a great manager because in moving up the career path, they will be dealing with many personalities in high pressure environments.

Chef Brian Rutherford is wearing our Men’s Raglan 3/4 Sleeve Chef Coat and teaching his students how to make Crab Cakes with Roasted Corn Salsa, Avocado Butter & Lime Butter Sauce.

Chef Brian Rutherford teaching his students at Sheridan Technical Center 

The Birthplace of our Chef of the Month, Chef Brian Rutherford

May’s Chef of the Month, Chef Brian Rutherford was born in Doylestown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. It is close to Philadelphia, just an hour away and 1½ hours from New York. This town has a vibrant cultural history with a thriving arts community.

According to Doylestown Township, “the name “Doylestown” was apparently derived from the innkeeper William Doyle who obtained a license to keep a public house in 1745 known as “Doyle’s Tavern”. This building, once the Fountain House and currently a Starbucks, is located at the northwest corner of the intersection of Main and State streets in Doylestown Borough. From its earliest days as an unnamed colonial wilderness, Doylestown grew along with America into a quiet country town. In 1792, a stagecoach route sprang up along the Philadelphia-Easton Road (now Main Street), and Doylestown remained a stopover along the route.Because of its geographic location, Bucks County became the crossroads of the American Revolution.”

Doylestown PA

Population: 8,365 according to the U.S Census Bureau 2013 estimate

Interesting Facts about Pennsylvania taken from 50states.com

  1. Pennsylvania is the only original colony not bordered by the Atlantic Ocean.
  2. Pennsylvania is the first state of the fifty United States to list their web site URL on a license plate.
  3. In 1909 the first baseball stadium was built in Pittsburgh.
  4. In 1913 the first automobile service station opened in Pittsburgh.
  5. Bob Hoffman of York is hailed the world round as the Father of Weightlifting. Hoffman started York Barbell Corp. in 1932 and preached the gospel of physical fitness throughout his life as an U.S. Olympic coach, businessman and philanthropist.
  6. In Hazleton, there is a law on the books that prohibits a person from sipping a carbonated drink while lecturing students in a school auditorium.
  7. Penn Township, officially referred to as the Township of Penn, was named after the founder of Pennsylvania, William Penn.

Museums and Attractions:

Fonthill Museum
Moravian Pottery and Tile Works
Bryn Athyn Cathedral
Kid’s Castle
Natural Shrine of Our Lady of Czestochowa
Michener Art Museum

Fonthill Museum

Fonthill Museum

Who else is from Doylestown?

Pink – Pop rock star

James A. Michener – author of Tales of the South Pacific, Hawaii, The Drifters

William Edgar Geil – author and first person to traverse entire path of the Great Wall of China

Oscar Hammerstein II – songwriter, producer, director

Pearl Buck – nobel Prize winning author

Margaret Mead – anthropologist

Christian Bauman – novelist and NPR commentator

Alan Campbell – actor and author

Stefan Avalos – motion picture director

Mike Senica – NASCAR and ARCA Series Race Driver

Mike Pettine – Cleveland Browns Head Coach

 

The next time you are in Pennsylvania, check out Trip Advisor’s Top 10 Most Recommended Restaurants:

Honey

Hickory Chicken

Best Taste of India II

Cross Culture

Quinoa Peruvian & Mexican Restaurant

Nonno’s

Ooka

The Zen Den

Cross Keys Diner

Vintage Grille

 

Have anything else to add? Leave a comment below! We’d love to hear from you!

 

Chefuniforms.com Chef of the Month May

May 2014 Chef of the Month, Brian Rutherford

Brian Rutherford - chef of the month MayChef Brian Rutherford is a native of Philadelphia who has called South Florida home for the past 17 years. A graduate of the prestigious CIA (Culinary Institute of America) in Hyde Park, New York, he honed his craft first in Philadelphia before landing in Boca Raton at Max’s Grille in Mizner Park. At Max’s Grille, he worked for South Florida restaurant icons Burt Rapoport and Dennis Max, while training with Chefs John Belleme and Joe Longo. After a three year stint at Max’s, Chef Rutherford moved to South Beach to head up the kitchen as the Executive Chef in opening Pearl Restaurant and Champagne Lounge. Pearl was a hip, innovative restaurant that on any given night entertained the likes of Mick Jagger, Rod Stewart and Michael Jordan. Being the Executive Chef of Pearl for over two years allowed Chef Rutherford’s creative abilities to blossom. From South Beach, Chef Rutherford moved to Ft Lauderdale, heading up the kitchen at Bistro Mezzaluna, a neighborhood favorite on the east side of town. Bistro Mezzaluna was where Chef Rutherford was most comfortable, spending the next 10 years as the chef. He was able to refine his talents in serving the best quality products while using simple, fresh ingredients, while satisfying even the most discerning palates.

In his latest endeavor, Chef Rutherford has spent the past few years working as a Chef Instructor teaching his craft to young culinary students at Sheridan Technical Center in Hollywood, Florida. Chef Rutherford’s focus has changed dramatically from being an Executive Chef to training the future chefs of tomorrow. Sharing his passion and dedication with young chefs has always been a dream of his after realizing how important the culinary school experience was in his own career path.

Along with teaching, Chef Rutherford keeps busy by spending time with his wife Michele and their two children, ages 7 and 9. Chef Rutherford also enjoys golfing and eating at other restaurants as much as possible.

Read on for our in-depth interview with our Chef of the Month for May.

Congratulations Chef Brian Rutherford on being our Chef of the Month for May! We love your personal touches on everything…

 

1.   What is your birthplace? 

Doylestown, Pennsylvania

 

2.  What made you decide to become a chef? 

I like to eat and my parents used to cook the same food all the time and I got bored eating the same dishes. I started experimenting and then got a job in a restaurant when I was attending high school and this where I fell in love with it.  I get a major rush every time I work in a restaurant.

 

3.  What do you enjoy doing outside of being a chef? 

I love spending time with my family – my wife and 2 kids and golfing is my next passion.

 

4.  What is your Must Have Kitchen Tool?

I like all kitchen tools but the Japanese Mandolin is one of my favorites! It is a versatile veggie cutter and it cuts vegetables very thin and very fine like a julienne cut (cutting into long, thin strips, like matchsticks) and batonnet cut (another type of long strips).

 

Japanese Mandolin Chefuniforms.com

 

5.  Do you enjoy dining out on your free time? What is your favorite type of cuisine? 

Yes. I love to eat at ethnic or small out of the way places.

 

6.  What fabric and style of chef uniform do you enjoy wearing the most? 

Egyptian cotton and Seersucker chef jackets. I love that they are short sleeve perfect for the Florida weather and they are very light and has high textured patterns.

 

7.  Chef Brian Rutherford’s Chicken and Italian Sausage with Rigatoni and Balsamic Recipe

Ingredients:

1.5 Ounces Olive Oil
3 Ounces Diced, Marinated Chicken (oil, garlic, basil, parsley)
Salt and Pepper
3 Ounces Italian Sweet Sausage (cooked and cut on the bias)
2 Ounces Roasted Red and Yellow Peppers (mixed)
2 Tablespoons Basil, chopped
1 Tablespoon Parsley, chopped
1 Teaspoon Pepperoncini, chopped
1 Teaspoon Garlic, minced
4 Ounces White Wine
2 Ounces Balsamic Vinegar
4 Ounces Roasted Chicken Stock
1 Ounce Butter
7-8 Ounces Rigatoni, cooked
Salt and Pepper
1 Ounce Parmesan Cheese, grated
1 Tablespoon Parsley, chopped
1 Ounce Olive Oil

 

Method: 

Heat oil in a sauté pan until it just starts to smoke. Add chicken and season with salt and pepper. Brown chicken a little on both sides. Add the sausage, roast peppers, basil, parsley, pepperoncini, and garlic, and sauté for 1-2 minutes.

Deglaze the pan with white wine and reduce by half. Add balsamic vinegar and reduce by half. Add roasted chicken stock and reduce by half. Stir in butter, and let simmer for 1-2 minutes. Toss in the pasta and add olive oil, salt, pepper, grated cheese, and parsley. Buon Appetito!

 

Brian Rutherford's Chicken and Italian Sausage with Rigatoni and Balsamic Recipe - Chefuniforms.com Chef of the Month May

 

~His experience and advice~

 

8.  How long have you been a chef and where did you study? 

Since 1985. I studied at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, NY.

 

9.  What education or experience would you recommend for aspiring chefs? 

I highly recommend an apprentice program using the format I teach at Sheridan Technical Center. My students get hands on experience and learn a lot of different techniques and styles of the culinary profession and they practice what they learn. It is inexpensive, they build a good foundation with the basics and they also eat what is cooked getting exposure to casual and formal culinary styles. Experience is the best teacher and it is the little things that you pick up from being hands-on and experimental that theory cannot teach you which is what I try to impart to my students. Cooking schools are also another great choice as well because they also show you a wide variety of cooking techniques as well.

 

10.  What would you recommend as far as on-the-job training? 

Go to a Technical School first as it’s a short program and learn the basics and get your hands dirty as you are practicing what you are learning and see if you still want to be a chef after that. If you do, then go and work at a restaurant. I would not recommend working for a restaurant only as you will only learn one or two specific specialties depending on what the restaurant’s niche is. Learn to be a great manager because as you move up the career path, you will be dealing with many personalities in high pressure environments. As part of Sheridan Technical Center’s curriculum, I teach my students in 3 courses: food handling and servsafe practices, culinary nutrition and management. They spend 30 hours a term for each class.

 

11.  Can you offer some advice for aspiring chefs?

Read and follow chefs who you can learn from and be your mentors.

When I was working at Max’s Grille in Boca Raton, Chef John Belleme asked “What I was doing outside of working” and I said “nothing.” He said “I should be bettering myself and reading all kinds of different materials and constantly learning so I can continue to be current and innovative.”

 

12.  How do chefs use technology in their day to day operations?     

I used a technology called Chef Tech where you plug in everything you bought plus the recipes you want to create and the it then calculates the yields and estimates of how many meals you can create as well as the food costs associated with it each meal.

 

~2014 and The Future~

13.  What dining trends do you see taking place for 2014?

I see a lot of comfort foods coming back. A lot of Grilled Cheese places are popping up all over and Mac and Cheese is another favorite being served more in restaurants. People relate to these foods from when they were growing up and they want to continue enjoying them.

 

14.  How has the revolution to eat healthy influenced you as a Chef? environmentally friendly? 

I have always cooked healthy and like my meals to be light and fresh. At my last job at Bistro Mezzaluna, Fort Lauderdale, we had 10 pasta dishes on our menu and none of them were cream based but more olive oil based. At Sheridan Technical Center, we have a Chef’s Corner where 2 students get to try dishes that are healthy.

 

15.  What do you think of “Green Kitchens?” Is it realistic to outfit your kitchens to be

To a certain degree. It is still hard to do and if you choose in going that direction, you have to be 100% committed. Wood Burning grills is a good example and is used in many places.

 

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