Tag Archives: chef cooking

Chef Carter’s Southwest Deviled Eggs

Deviled eggs are making a comeback, we’ve been seeing them on menus left and right. But our Chef of the Month, Carter’s recipe will make you rethink traditional deviled eggs and will have you dying to try tons of deviled egg variants. I mean, let’s be honest, it is not a party unless someone brought the deviled eggs. Try these out on your friends and family and you’ll surely be adding them as one of your regular go-to recipes!

Deviled Eggs

Southwest Deviled Eggs

Ingredients:

6 eggs

¼ cup mayonnaise

1 teaspoon white vinegar

1 teaspoon yellow mustard

Salt, to taste

Ground pepper, to taste

2 large avocados

1 tablespoon of prepared Picante Sauce

Garnish: Paprika, Fresh cilantro (if desired)

For the Eggs:

Place eggs in a saucepan and cover with enough water to cover the top of the eggs. Heat on high until water begins to boil, then cover, turn the heat to low, and cook for 1 minute. Remove from heat and leave covered for 14 minutes, then rinse under cold water continuously for 1 minute.

Crack egg shells and carefully peel under cool running water. Gently dry with paper towels. Slice the eggs in half, removing yolks to a bowl, and placing the whites on a serving platter. Mash the yolks into a fine crumble using a fork. Add mayonnaise, vinegar, mustard, salt, and pepper, and mix well.

For the Guacamole:

Cut open the avocado in half, length wise, and remove the seed. Then scoop the avocado out of the skin. Dice the avocados into cubes. Using a fork mash the avocados into a paste. Add picante sauce, salt, and pepper. Mix until well combined.

Putting it all Together:

Add the guacamole into the egg yolk mixture and mix well. Place the yolk mixture into a pipping bag or a zip lock bag with the tip cut off. Pipe the yolk mixture into the egg whites, garnish with paprika and serve. Place a little cilantro on the side for color.

Deviled eggs are a great thing to serve. Since I am from Texas, we like to serve guacamole on everything. One day, I decided to mix them together and my family loved the flavor.

Want to see more of Jr. Chef Carter’s recipes? Connect with our April Chef of the Month here:

Instagram: @chef.carterhull

Twitter: @chef_carterhull

February 2017 Chef of the Month Alekka Sweeney

 

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Chef Alekka is wearing CU coat #86515 in Sky Blue

We’re celebrating February aka ‘the month of love’ by bringing you an extra sweet Chef of the Month Alekka Sweeney! Chef Alekka is an owner of a shop that teaches pastry and baking classes near Chicago. Alekka is not only a baking and pastry master chef, she also has with an amazing personality accompanied with great advice and experience. It was truly a special treat for us to chat with her. Read more about our awesome February Chef of the Month below and stay tuned for her delicious recipes throughout the month.

1. Where were you born?

I was born in Naples, Italy. But I am American and so are both of my parents. My dad was in the Navy and stationed there so I was born there.

2. Where do you work and where are you based?

I am the owner of my shop called Give Me Some Sugar that is located in Roscoe Village, Chicago.  But it is not a bakery, it is a school where we teach classes on baking and pastry. I started the company 10 years ago. The first 2 years were in classes in client’s homes so that I could build up a client base and test recipes. This was right at the beginning of shows like Ace of Cakes and Cake Boss. Back then my car was basically a mobile cake decorating machine; it was filled with buttercream. So eventually I had my real estate agent look for places. I visited so many places but then I found it. When I walked into the shop, I had a “this is it,” moment and we’ve been at this location for the past 8 years.

3. What is your favorite kitchen tool in creating your masterpieces/dishes?

I can’t live without an offset spatula, serrated knife, and the mixer I’ve had since I was sixteen.

4. What is your sharpest sense out of all the 5 senses?

Smell.

5. What advice would you offer for aspiring chefs?

It is a tough industry to be in. You have to work nights, weekends, and holidays. But my best piece of advice is to find the pastry chef or chefs that you admire and respect. Try and work for them, even if it is for free and during that time learn as much as you can. Before you land on the place you want to work forever, the best thing you can do is learn and get as much as experience as possible. I’ve worked in hotels, bakeries, corporations, big business, small business. The culmination of doing all of that led me to where I am today.

Make sure to get your hands in everything and don’t settle on one thing. Work for as many people as you can so you learn new perspectives and different ways of doing things. And be prepared to stand on your feet for a long time, invest in your shoes.

6. What is one culinary tip every chef should know and perfect?

Measuring properly. I see a lot of people using the wrong measure tool. Even on TV, I see people measuring dry ingredients with a tool that is for liquids. It is my pet peeve. First understand your recipes, master the basics, and make sure to read the recipes correctly. Baking is very precise.

7. What does good food mean to you?

I think the pastries I gravitate towards are the ones that make me think of my mom and being at home. I grew up eating my mom’s homemade bread. My mom saves water from mashed potatoes and makes potato bread, it is amazing. So I gravitate towards foods and desserts that are farm to table.

8. What features are important to you when selecting a Chef Coat? (particular fabric, style, sleeve length, pockets)

I am so happy the industry is coming out with chef coats for women. Cuts for women that show that you have a waist. I also like front and side pockets to hold my must have my sharpie. I really like the women’s style of pants and chef coats. Especially not having to look like a potato sack. The features I like are having something that is both flattering and functional.

9. Favorite ingredient to work with?

Chocolate. I really like tempering chocolate and making chocolate candies. I kind of had to teach myself. I used to work at a candy place in Chicago and I really had to learn myself. At that job, I had to temper white chocolate in the middle of the summer. I just kept playing with it over and over again and now they call me the chocolate tempering queen.

10. Favorite City to dine out in?

Chicago first and then Pittsburgh is a close second. Pittsburgh is getting up there. Chicago is the one I like the most. You can get any kind of food here from any culture. I like that Chicago has amazing hole in the wall restaurants. It doesn’t have to be super fancy but you can go down an alley and in a scary door and the food is amazing. Chicago is a city that can satisfy any type of craving.

11. Best Dish you have ever made?

It’s really simple. I really want to blow you away with a fancy French pastry. But whenever I go to my friend’s house or a party they always ask that I make chocolate espresso brownies. They are really fudgy and rich.

12. Person you would most like to cook for?

Dorie Greenspan. I really respect and admire her career path. She just released Dories Cookies and it is something like her 12th baking book. She’s comparable to Martha Stuart. She was before all the food bloggers, Instagram and Twitter accounts. She just seems so nice and super sweet and I just would like to hang out with her and bake cookies all day.

13. What made you decide to become a chef?

Two different versions of this story. I will tell you the real one and you can decide whether it is appropriate to publish. I was 24 at that time and it was 1997. After you go to culinary school, you have to do an internship somewhere. Normally once you are done with school most people go back to their internship and work there. I did that as well. The pastry chef at the time was involved with the owner’s daughter and he had a problem with alcohol. One day, they didn’t know where he went and they needed a wedding cake made in two days. They turned to me. This was in 1997 remember, there is no google, no videos, no internet to help me.

I turned to Martha Stuart’s wedding cake books. I always say it chose me, I didn’t choose it.But I have a very statistical mind and I follow formulas and recipes very well. It was the best thing for me. Baking is strict but it still leaves room for creativity. It was the best thing that ever happened to me.

Final note from Chef Alekka:

It was a series of events that got me working in this industry and then staying in it. First, it is a great industry to work in and there are so many outlets where you can work as a chef. You can travel, be a personal chef, baker, own a business or restaurant.

And this industry and food will never be replaced by a robot. Food is how you show your love. I have met people and all the places I have got to go are because this industry helped me get there.

Get in touch with our February Chef of the Month:

Website: Give Me Some Sugar 

Facebook: Give Me Some Sugar

Instagram: @givesugar

 

January 2017 Chef of the Month Stefen Dobrec

 

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Chef Stefen is wearing ChefUniforms Bold Stripe Apron style #300BOL

Happy New Year, we hope you celebrated the end of 2016 and beginning of 2017 with loved ones and great food! All of us at ChefUniforms are excited for another year of awesome chefs, great recipes, and exciting news coming your way.

We’re starting 2017 off with a bang and are very excited to introduce our January 2017 Chef of the Month, Stefen Dobrec! Read more about his life and journey as a chef below.

1. Where were you born?

I am from a little town called Danville in California.

2. Where do you work and where are you based?

I run my own website called BigChefLittleKitchen.com. The inspiration for the name came from me being almost 6’4” and cooking in my small Manhattan apartment kitchen. The name was one of those “ah-ha” moments that just came to me, I checked the domain and it was available so that’s how it all started.

3. What is your favorite kitchen tool in creating your masterpieces/dishes?

My chef knife. Honestly, I use it the most, it is the tool I have invested the most money in. So much chopping goes on in the kitchen. I always say to invest in two things, your shoes and your bed. My third is a good chef knife.

4. What is your sharpest sense out of all the 5 senses?

Probably my taste. I am not a big recipe guy. I visualize it first and hope that through trial and error it turns out tasting the way I want it. Then after I taste it and perfect it, I go back and figure out the measurements for a recipe.

5. What advice would you offer for aspiring chefs?

The main advice I would offer aspiring chefs is to cook every day. Doesn’t matter if it’s one meal, three meals, or five meals. Cook something every day. I try to cook something new but even if I don’t and I end up cooking one of my staple dishes, every time I cook it I try to make the dish better.

6. What is one culinary tip every chef should know and perfect?

Make and master scrambled eggs. It is the simplest thing, but it goes a long way. I’m sure most people feel the same way. There is an ongoing joke with my girlfriend’s side of the family that you have to “make Stefen eggs.” My only secret to delicious eggs is season them before hand and whip them with a form to make them light and fluffy.

7. What does good food mean to you?

Good food means a lot of things to me. It’s almost an event. It’s sight, the smell, the taste, the sounds, and the people you are with. Good food is just being around a table with family and friends and enjoying a variety of things.

8. What features are important to you when selecting your Chef outfit?

I am pretty standard; I like to wear business casual. The biggest thing is the apron for me. My go-to is my apron over the top of a collared shirt with rolled up sleeves. I like my apron to have one or two pockets in the front, with sturdy material that I know will last after multiple washes. I also keep a towel because I am constantly washing my hands and need a place for my phone just in case I get sudden inspiration and want to add it to my notes.

9. Favorite ingredient to work with?

My favorite ingredient to work with is beets. They are so versatile. My signature dish is my beet sliders. They are a very underutilized vegetable. You can roast, grill, shred them; they can be sweet or savory. To me, the possibilities are endless.

10. Favorite City to dine out in?

I have to say New York City. It is the culinary capital for a reason. There is a great mixture of 5-star restaurants as well as mom and pop places. Both have high quality and equally delicious foods. Plus, you can find whatever you are craving during any time of the day or night.

11. Best Dish you have ever made?

Honestly my breakfast mac and cheese, it’s not as healthy as most of the other stuff I make, but honestly, it is ridiculous.  The mac itself has sweet potatoes and jalapeño, and the whole thing topped with a sunny-side egg. I personally like to add Sriracha too. It’s even better served with mimosas.

12. Place you eat most often on your days off?

My dining room table. I said my best advice is to cook every day and I try my best to abide by it. I cook breakfast and dinner almost every single day. And lunch most days as well. I am big on preparing my groceries the day I get them so it is easier to come home and throw something together.

13. Who is the person you would most like to cook for?

Honestly Bobby Flay. My love for food and cooking came when I was young and would come home after various practices and watch Boy Meets Grill or Iron Chef America.  Just to be able to cook for him and get his input and just talk to him about food and cooking would be insane.

14. What is new on your DVR?

I was all in on Westworld; So on my DVR I would say I’m most looking forward to starting the new show by Donald Glover, Atlanta.

Stay tuned and check back for some amazing recipes from Chef Stefen that will be shared throughout the month. Make sure to check out his website BigChefLittleKitchen.com and follow him on Instagram @bigcheflittlekitchen.

December 2016 Chef of the Month Rod Knight

chef-rod-jump-with-hat2Can you believe 2016 is coming to a close already? We are extremely excited to showcase our last Chef of the Month for the year: Chef Rod Knight!

We guarantee this is one Chef of the Month you don’t want to miss! Chef Rod went above and beyond and his step-by-step recipes are incredible. Read more about his life and chef career below and make sure to check back next week for his first recipe!

1. Birthplace: Danbury, Connecticut

2. Where do you work and where are you based?

I work at a French brasserie called Thursdays on Las Olas Boulevard in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

3. What is your favorite kitchen tool in creating your masterpieces/dishes?

My favorite kitchen tool is the vacuum chamber machine. It allows me to literally marinate or pickle something within seconds. It significantly cuts down a lot of time and the amount of waste. Plus, once you vacuum an item it increases the shelf life exponentially.

4. What is your sharpest sense out of all the 5 senses?

Interesting, I think that my sense of touch is my sharpest sense. I have never cut myself more than a nick and I think that has to do with my sense of touch.

5. What advice would you offer for aspiring chefs?

I would say stay curious and focus intently on the details. Good dishes are a combination of very small parts that are put together well. Make sure you are aware of how you communicate. How you communicate is a very important part of being a chef because how you speak and what you say translates to everyone you work with and it will literally better the team.

6. What is one culinary tip every chef should know and perfect?

Keep your pans hot. You aren’t going to get far without hot pans.

7. What does good food mean to you?

Good food to me is something that is exciting to share with others. It also takes into account health and nutrition. I believe you can’t untwine the two. What we are eating and how we are eating but it has to be good for you. Also, good food is fresh with fresh ingredients. I guess to sum it up good food is passion on a plate.

8. What trends do you see emerging in the near future?

There’s been a lot of talk about no tipping. All of the servers’ wages and all of the food prices would get raised to cover the no tipping paradigm. Personally, I think if companies do raise the minimum wage, they will expect more from the employees.

I see a lot more with digital cloud services for cooks training and communication. I think we are going to see a breakdown of titles and positions and see more of the cooks and prep cooks taking on more responsibility which would allow the chefs on duty to administer more effectively. With everything online we are learning faster and quicker and the guys on my team who are in school ask me questions that stump me all the time. On a broader level, this will lead to a lot more creativity to make the things.

9. What features are important to you when selecting a Chef Coat? (particular fabric, style, sleeve length, pockets)

I definitely go with a short sleeve. I like to go with styles that breathe easy. I do like a more traditional style but with a modern fresh approach. I am slim, so I prefer a slimmer fit. I don’t like button ups. The coats I have now have material like Nike dry fit that wicks away moisture and are light weight.

10. What is your go-to chef outfit? Do you prefer coats, tees, pants, shorts, aprons, hats, etc?

For my go-to workwear, I usually wear a cargo style black pant. I typically wear one of my white chef coats. Sometimes I will wear a cap but I always wear crocs.

11. Favorite ingredient to work with?

This is hard, my favorite ingredient I like to work with is Dijon mustard.  I specifically like to pair it with maple, mustard, and Cajun to make a really good marinade that is a little spicy. For a quick fix, I like to have pan seared salmon and splatter mustard on there and bread crumbs. Or red wine vinaigrette adding Dijon. I find it to be a very versatile condiment. But of course, you can’t live without eggs.

12. Best Dish you have ever made?

Okay, so this is fun. I came across this recipe maybe a year ago. I came across a website that had Berbere, an Ethiopian spice. Last year I really got into spices. This one is really cool, so I tried it out. It is smoky, spicy and red in color. It is extensive work to toast it and to process it. It has a very eastern flavor, I guess they have been using it for centuries. So I went to the fish market and got Bronzino. I was having some people over for dinner so I did a dry rub and got a really nice roast on the fish, it was almost magical. I served it with lemon roasted tomatoes. It was very exotic, with Chile peppers, garlic, ginger, basil, and a little bit of nutmeg.

13. Place you eat most often on your days off?

There is a sushi place in Pompano Beach. It is called 9 Face Sushi and they knock it out of the ballpark. Always fresh, the service is amazing. I like to sit outside and enjoy the view.

14. Person you would most like to cook for?

You know what, I’d like to cook for Stan Lee.

15. What made you decide to become a chef?

I am an only child. My mom is a chemical engineer. I would get out of school and go home. I would watch 3 shows on Food Network. These shows got me into and gave me permission to get my hands dirty. I would have food made, I can’t imagine it was good at the time. So I started doing things in elementary school.

But I applied and got into a Connecticut vocational technical school in the culinary department when I was in high school. I started learning techniques. My junior year, Johnson and Wales got accreditation and I got an associate’s degree in culinary. It took burning a lot of things and figuring out where I went wrong and teaching it to the next person. To sum it up, I became a chef because of curiosity and a lot of it has to do with the fact that I am creative. Being a chef, I found a happy place to be and express my creativity every day.

16. What is new on your DVR?

On my DVR is Preacher, The Walking Dead, and The Flash. Those are my top three shows that I make time to watch.

Once again thank you to Chef Rod Knight and don’t forget to stay tuned for his recipes that will be featured throughout the month.

 

5 Tips to help Chefs Survive Their First Job in the Kitchen

Chefs first job in the Kitchen Chefs first job in the Kitchen

We’ve seen how messy things can get when you don’t respect the kitchen. We’ve seen how accidents can happen when you aren’t paying attention. These things can and will happen, but a seasoned chef will know just how to avoid some common missteps and mistakes on the job. A newbie, however, will need all the help they can get – which is why we’ve compiled a list of tips to surviving your first job in the kitchen.

Be aware of your environment – kitchens can be loud, hectic and dangerous. Always know who and what is around you – and let others know when you’re near them. Learn to use these terms, if you want to keep your job (and your health), and look like you know what you’re doing:

  • Corner – coming around the corner
  • Behind you – walking behind someone
  • Sharp – walking with a sharp knife
  • Hot – walking with a hot pot

Keep a clean work space – Keep your station neat, clean and organized. That not only includes keeping all food and tools in their proper places, but keeping your chef coat or apron stain free, as well. For tips on how to keep your coat as clean as possible, read our blog, Keeping Your Chef Coat Clean During the Holidays.

Chefs first job in the Kitchen

Move efficiently – Don’t just run around the kitchen aimlessly. Know what you need, where to find it, and minimize the amount of time you spend moving around the kitchen. This is not only for your safety, but for the safety of everyone else in that kitchen. Be considerate to those around you and don’t crowd their work space by being in an area you don’t need to be in.

Don’t act like a know-it-all – Stop trying to impress everyone and do what you are told. You are new to this, and your head chef knows that. Don’t pretend to know everything just to show off. If anything, he or she will be happier to see you learning and producing consistently well-prepared dishes than to see you try something you saw on TV once and fail miserably. Always under promise and over deliver. Listen to your head chef and do as he or she says.

Last but not least, Stay Calm! – A professional kitchen is a high-pressure environment. If you are nervous or unsure, you will make everyone around you nervous as well. You can freak out on the inside, but outside you need to be calm, cool and collected. Focus on the task in front of you. Take it one step at a time, and get it right the first time. Don’t start yelling at everyone, unless you’re the head chef – unless you want a one way ticket out of his kitchen.

Chefs first job in the Kitchen

Can you think of any other tips for new kitchen staff? Post it below!

An Interview with Executive Chef Jason Viscount

Recipe Below: Sage Papardelle with Duck Ragout

Presented by: ChefUniforms.com

York native Jason Viscount did not always dream of becoming a chef. He was, however, fortunate enough to have a role model to learn from. As the hostess of many dinner parties, Viscount’s grandmother prepared meals such as Welsh rarebit, made with cheese, beer and mustard sauce.

During his middle school years, Viscount also had a chance to learn from his restaurateur father, and working in two of his father’s restaurants sparked his interest in culinary arts. Viscount and his family lived in the basement of one of the restaurants, and food deliveries coming into the restaurant via Viscount’s bedroom were a regular occurrence.

Viscount’s life had always been influenced by fine cuisine and the food service industry, and by the time he needed to decide upon a career, he didn’t hesitate to attend the Restaurant School of Philadelphia.

It was at the Restaurant School that Viscount fully developed and nurtured his passion for food. After graduation, Viscount returned to central Pennsylvania and became a chef at the Yorktowne Hotel, followed by a stint at Hotel Hershey’s Circular Dining Room and eventually an eight-year run as chef de cuisine at Harrisburg Hilton’s Golden Sheaf.

Now at BRICCO, Viscount enjoys the title of executive chef and all of the responsibility and creative freedom that come with it. Since starting at BRICCO, Viscount has been cooking up numerous accolades for himself and the restaurant. In 2007, Harrisburg Magazine readers named BRICCO “Best New Restaurant” and in March 2008 Viscount was named Chef of the Year by the Hershey Harrisburg Tourism and Convention Bureau.

Viscount’s zeal for fine food is not put on the back burner when he exits the restaurant after work. At the home Viscount shares with his wife, you’ll find him enjoying his extra-large kitchen that fills the space of the regular kitchen, as well as the dining room. Viscount may conjure up plenty of his own recipes there, but the influences of Viscount’s past still remain. Lamb kidney stew on an English muffin and a slice of tomato — Viscount’s grandmother’s breakfast specialty — is still the perfect way for Viscount to start each day.

I sat down with Viscount and asked him to share with me some thoughts on his experiences, what brought to this point in his career and how he directs his kitchen. I also asked him to share a nice recipe of his; you will find it at the bottom of this interview:

Why did you want to become a chef?
When I was a child, I lived with my grandmother. She taught me how to cook, and we cooked dinner parties together. When I was 12, my father bought two restaurants and I worked at both of them.

What education would you recommend for aspiring chefs?
Always work in the best restaurant you can for two or more years, then go to culinary school.

What do you recommend for on the job training?
Do your homework and pick the best place to learn from.

Do you see any changes in food trends?
Experimental Cuisine is becoming a trend; keeping a balance between modern cuisine while maintaining a healthy and sustainable approach to food preparation.

What is your greatest challenge in getting the ingredients you need?
The real challenge is finding the sources for them. Every menu takes me weeks to find the right products.

Has the price of energy affected your industry?
Yes. Food prices, delivery charges and over all costs have gone up.

Do you see any dining trends within the US or abroad; including types of food today?
Local and fresh food, quality made items with thought in to the flavors

Do you see any dining trends surfacing for the future?
While prices keep rising you will see chefs becoming more creative with the ingredients they use. The meat portions will tend to be smaller and the accompaniments will tend to be the focal point of the plate.

How much of the recipes you create is corporate and how much is your own?
My staff and I come up with all of our recipes. Our corporation uses a lot of them in the other hotels they own and manage.

What fabric and style of uniform do you enjoy wearing most?
All of our cooks wear black chef pants and classic white chef jackets. Students wear white beanie hats and cooks wear black beanie hats. Chefs wear toques.

What is your method of developing your Sous chefs?
We always promote within a company when we can. We move people around the company so that can grow and learn more.

Do you try to create a team spirit and environment with the kitchen staff? If so how do you accomplish it?
I hire and promote people that compliment me and have strengths where I need it. Also, the people that work with me must know hospitality and be interested in cooking for the guest and not just themselves.

When preparing your menu do you consider health and try to prepare foods that are healthier?
We offer vegetarian items as well as lighter cuisine on our menu.

Do you notice any resistance to unhealthy dishes?
No I don’t see any resistance however there is a growing trend of people eating healthier foods. If the food tastes good there is no resistance.

Do you enjoy dining out in your free time?
Yes I travel every year to seek out new restaurant and new items.

Do you try to experience the food at your competitors? Do you ever get ideas from competitors?
In our area we try and stay cutting edge, and most of the time they are getting their ideas from Bricco.

Do you think it is important to visit the markets rather than just have standard orders?
I worked in a farmers market for years and I use the local farms whenever I can.

How do you test a new recipe without putting it on the permanent menu?
We always make them and try them first with the staff, and then try them out on the chefs table.

Do you pick the wines or is there a separate beverage manager?
I pick them. We have over 150 wines on our wine list along with 45 wines by the glass, and wine flights. We have a lot of Italian wines as well as several local Pennsylvania wines. We do a lot of wine education at Bricco and all are staff is very knowledgeable about our wine list and are encouraged to give input on the wine list.

What is your advice for planning a menu for a new restaurant?
Cook for what your guest wants…not what you want to cook. Our menu has changed a lot at Bricco over the years. Listen to your guests.

Could you please share a recipe with us???

Sage Papardelle with Duck Ragout

Ingredients: Amount
Duck ragout (recipe follows) 5 oz
Sage Papardelle 12 ea
Buerre Monte 1 oz
Veal Demi glace 1 oz
S&P T.T.
Parsley garnish
Shaved Pecorino cheese garnish

METHOD:
1. For pick up; heat duck ragout up in a sauté pan, add butter, demi, salt and pepper
2. Drop pasta into water and cook, once cooked toss in pan with duck and a little bit of pasta water creating a sauce, serve in a large bowl with parsley and shaved cheese

Duck Ragout
Ingredient Amount
Olive oil as needed

Duck, legs 6ea.
Pancetta 1 cup
White onion, minced Cup
Celery, minced 2oz.
Carrots, minced 2oz.
Pancetta, minced 2oz.

Rosemary sprigs 3ea.
Thyme sprigs 3ea.
Bay leaf 3ea.
Parsley leaves, (Italian) chopped 3Tbsp.
Garlic minced 1Tbsp.
Juniper berries, crushed 12ea.
Black peppercorns, crushed 4ea.
Tomato paste 2Tbsp.
Salt t.t.
Red wine ¼Cup
Chicken stock as needed

Method
1. Heat olive oil and butter, when butter is melted add duck pieces, and brown slowly, rendering out excess fat. Add vegetables sauté about 15-20 minutes. Add brandy and cook out.
2. Dice pancetta and add to duck
3. Add broth, to cover by 1-inch, tomato paste, herbs and spices. Taste for seasoning. Braise on stovetop, slowly, for 1 hour or more time as needed. Cool and skim fat.
4. Once meat is pulled off bone, strain sauce and reduce till heavy nape, add back to duck and reserve for service

Bricco Sage Pasta Dough

Ingredients: Amount
Flour, OO flour 2.2#
Eggs 8
1 oz olive oil 1 oz
1 oz water 1 oz
Pinch of salt
Sage, minced 3 oz

METHOD:
1. combine all ingredients in Hobart mixer
2. turn on to speed 2 and walk away
3. when mixture becomes a ball pull out of mixture and hand kneed till smooth
4. wrap in plastic and let rest for 30 minutes

NOTE:
If making flavored pastas add fresh or dried herbs to the dough before pulling out of the Hobart and then incorporating by hand for most flavorful results

If you are putting a liquid puree in pasta for color substitute wet ingredients for amount of puree used

Enjoy!
Chef Jason Viscount

Restaurant – BRICCO – A Tuscan-style restaurant featuring unique Mediterranean dishes, California-style stone oven pizza, homemade pasta and an extensive wine list.

Bricco
31 south 3rd street
Harrisburg Pa 17101
For Dining Reservations, Please call: 717-724-0222

This interview was provided exclusively by www.chefuniforms.com.
For a great selection of chef uniforms including discount chef coats, chef pants, non slip shoes, aprons and more please visit http://www.chefuniforms.com.

ChefUniforms.com: A Chef’s Reasons

Welcome to our very first blog entry here at ChefUniforms.com. We hope you find the articles interesting, fun, and informative. We will be covering many subjects and topics. I encourage you to write to me and tell me your chef story, idea, experience, favorite recipe, etc. I will be reviewing all materials sent in and may even post yours, with your picture and restaurant name to boot! Have you ever thought about why you wanted to become a Chef? It may be surprising to learn that not all Chefs’ agree on even this most basic question. I recently visited several nice restaurants in the South Florida area and asked several chefs about what attracted them to becoming a chef. Many said it was the desire to create combinations of ingredients to come up with a unique flavor, color, or texture. Several said it was the challenge of creating unique meals in the kitchen. Others said that were just passionate about eating! Some even blamed their mom. I never would have blamed my mom, but then again, she was a darn good cook. It seems to me that no matter the reason, becoming a chef takes education, patience, time, and a burning desire to create dishes that tantalize the palate and cause your guests to roll their eyes up into their head let out that all too familiar noise. After all, what better compliment can a Chef have when their guest actually likes what they make? Send me your ideas and thoughts as to what helped you to decide to become a Chef. I am always looking for additional information to add. Stay tuned for next week’s article. Don’t forget to bookmark us!

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