Tag Archives: French Cooking

Chef Rod Knight’s Easy Croque Monsieur Recipe

1I don’t think you all are ready for this recipe! As the holidays approach, sometimes we just need a quick and delicious meal, Chef of the Month Rod Knight shares us with his amazing Croque Monsieur recipe.

This quick and easy Croque Monsieur sans béchamel is guaranteed to satisfy the snack attack. It is a classic French sandwich that translates literally into “Crispy Mister,” due to the Gratin on the finish. We [Chef Rod and his team] actually “discovered” this method on accident – one shift during service we ran out of béchamel and had to fulfill the order, and this was a happy accident, as they say, necessity is the mother of ingenuity.

What you’ll need:2

1/2 lbs of baby swiss cheese

1/2 lbs of good quality ham

1/4 cup of heavy cream

6 slices of Harty Sliced Bread

Salt/pepper

Ground nutmeg

Directions:

1. Grate Cheese

3

2. In a mixing bowl, combine salt and pepper, ground nutmeg to taste, heavy cream, and cheese. Mix well.

3. On a greased cookie sheet, place 3 slices of bread, apply the cheese mixture to the slices and spread evenly across the whole slice.

5

4. Then layer the ham.

6

5. Repeat the same process for the top layer and place cheese side down on the sandwich.

7

6. Then next step is to add another layer of cheese to the top of the sandwich.

7. Bake on middle rack for about 10 minutes at 350 degrees.

10

8. Transfer to the top rack and broil until they are golden.

11

The final product:

1213

We hope you enjoyed this week’s delicious recipe from Chef Rod. Stay tuned for our Chef of the Month Rod Knight’s final recipe next week, it is a recipe that will satisfy all fish lovers’ cravings.

Chefuniforms.com December 2015 Chef of the Month - William Werner, Chef/Partner Craftsman and Wolves

December 2015 Chef of the Month – William Werner, Chef/Partner Craftsman and Wolves

Chefuniforms.com December 2015 Chef of the Month - William Werner, Chef/Partner Craftsman and WolvesWilliam Werner is Chef/Partner of Craftsman and Wolves (CAW), an award-winning
contemporary patisserie and cafe with a nod to classic French technique and an
emphasis on seasonal change, offering pastries, cakes, confections, confitures, breads,
desserts, as well as savory fare and signature drinks. Current locations include CAW
Valencia in the vibrant Mission district of San Francisco, a farmers’ market stand at the
venerable CUESA Ferry Plaza Farmers Market, and an online retail shop shipping
nationwide.

Since opening the first location in 2012, Werner has garnered praise both locally and
nationally in publications, including New York Times T magazine, Wall Street Journal,
Real Simple, Esquire, and Bon Appétit, and GQ magazine named his famous “Rebel
Within” as #6 on “The 50 Best Things to Eat and Drink Right Now.”

In addition to opening a second location in San Francisco’s Russian Hill neighborhood
this fall, William and team are expanding the online retail shop with new products to ship
both nationally and internationally. Werner serves as a Valrhona Pastry Chef Consultant and leads professional culinary
demonstrations and classes around the U.S. and Canada.

Chef Werner is a James Beard Foundation “Outstanding Baker” 2015 finalist, Dessert Professional’s “Top Ten Pastry Chefs of America 2015,” The Passion Company’s “2015 Most Passionate Chef/Restaurateur in San Francisco,” San Francisco Magazine’s “2014 Best Pastry Chef,” Plate Magazine’s “2014 30 Chefs to Watch,” Star Chefs’ “2013 Rising Star Artisan” and James Beard Foundation “Outstanding Pastry Chef” 2012-2014 semi-finalist.

Congratulations Chef Werner on being our Chef of the Month for December!

1. Where do you work and where are you based?
Craftsman and Wolves, a patisserie and cafe with two locations in San Francisco.

2. What is your favorite kitchen tool in creating your masterpieces?
Gray Kunz spoon

3. What is your Wisk Hand? Left or Right?
Right hand

4. What advice would you offer for aspiring pastry chefs?
Dig deep to the roots, don’t get caught up in the current trend, take time to understand the basics.

5. What is one tip every pastry chef should know and perfect?
How to work with chocolate.

6. What does a great dessert look like to you?
I believe you eat with your eyes first, so an appetizing dish is key, usually minimal wins for me, all ingredients on the plate are harmonious and make sense, nothing is there just to be there.

7. Favorite ingredient to work with?
Coconut

8. Favorite Dessert City?
Chicago

9. Best Dish you have ever made?
Braised beef cheek risotto on a camp stove

10. What trends do you see emerging in the near future for Pastry Chefs?
I see more health conscious desserts that don’t sacrifice flavor and texture — luxurious meets beneficial, if you will.

11. What features are important to you when selecting a Chef Coat? (particular fabric, style, sleeve length, pockets)
Short sleeved chef coats are my favorite, only one breast pocket, and definitely fitted. I’m not a fan of pen holders on the sleeve.

12. What is your go-to chef outfit?  Do you prefer coats, tees, pants, shorts, aprons, hats, etc?
Vintage Metallica t shirt, jeans and full bib apron.

Famous Chefs in History

Because of the French domination of the culinary scene since time began (or so it seems, anyway), it stands to reason the most famous chefs in history are – what else? – French, with the exception of one American woman (discussed later), who was, nevertheless, trained in classical French cooking.

Known as the “King of Chefs and the Chef of Kings,” Antoine Careme went from being an abandoned child left at the door of a restaurateur in 18th century Paris, to become the father of “haute cuisine” – the high art of French cooking – in the early 19th century. Chef to then-world movers and shakers such as diplomat Talleyrand-Perigord, the future King George IV, Czar Alexander I, and the powerful banker James Rothschild, Careme is noted for his voluminous writings on cooking, including the famed L’Art de la Cuisine Francaise (The Art of French Cooking), a five-volume masterpiece on menu planning, table settings, hundreds of recipes, and a history of French cooking.

Another Frenchman, George Auguste Escoffier, bridged the 19th and 20th centuries with a modernization of Careme’s elaborate cuisine by ingenious simplification of it. Escoffier lent his talents as a chef to open the Ritz and Carlton hotels with partner Cesar Ritz, and then went on to wow such illustrious passengers as Kaiser William II of Germany on the German liner Imperator. Besides being known for such famous treats at Peach Melba, created for Australian singer Nellie Melba in 1893, Escoffier penned numerous volumes on cooking and was largely instrumental in the betterment of conditions within commercial kitchens. A stickler for cleanliness, he demanded the same from his workers and forbade swearing or any type of violence, which at the time, was common as apprentices and other help were routinely beaten by older staff.

Charles Ranhofer, the son of a restrauteur and the grandson of a chef, goes down in the annals of great chefs as the first French chef to bring the grandeur of his country’s cuisine to America. Noted primarily as the head chef of New York City’s famed Delmonico’s restaurant, Ranhofer ran its kitchens for nearly 34 years. Serving such luminaries as President Andrew Johnson, President U.S. Grant, Charles Dickens, and a host of foreign dignitaries, Ranhofer created such culinary distinctions as Lobster Newburg and Baked Alaska, among many others. He also wrote “one of the most complete treatises of its kind,” according to the New York Times in praise of his book, The Epicurean, published in 1894.

A discourse on famous historical chefs would not be complete without the inclusion of one of the most gifted chefs of all time: an American woman named Julia Child. Born to a prominent California family, Child did not begin to cook until the age of 34. It was after she moved with her husband to France that she had her grand epiphany: Good food is more than roast beef and mashed potatoes. She flung herself headlong into an education at the esteemed Cordon Bleu cooking school in Paris and later wrote mastering the Art of French Cooking with two partners. Child went on to become the first “celebrity chef” with more books, television programs, newspaper columns, and magazine articles. She brought exquisite French cuisine to America as much with her “have-a-good-time” attitude toward cooking as she did with her talent and expertise.

To all these great chefs, we owe a debt for their giftedness and tireless contributions that have truly turned cooking into an art form.

It does make one wonder, however, if ever the temptation arose with any of them to ever dine secretly on a lowly peanut butter and jelly sandwich or to toast the evening with Kool-Aid and crackers. We’ll never know, but we’ll surely speculate – as we take another bite of quiche Lorraine.

Reprinted with permission from Author Keith Londrie II

Please take a moment to send us some feedback on this Blog Post.

For a great selection of Chef Coats, Chef Pants, Chef Shirts, & Chef Aprons, please visit: www.chefuniforms.com

%d bloggers like this: