Tag Archives: ingredients

MAY 2019 CHEF OF THE MONTH- DAYANNE KADOSH

We are so excited to bring in the new month, and with it, our May Chef of the Month! Meet Dayanne Kadosh, a Private Chef in the Miami area! Chef Dayanne envisions herself as an artist; an empty plate is her blank canvas. She was inspired by the skilled women in her family to follow her passion for food, and now her delicious dishes inspire us all! Read below to learn more about Chef Dayanne’s Story!

 

 

1. Where were you born?

I was born in Montevideo, Uruguay

2. Where do you work and where are you based?

I’m based in Bay Harbor, FL and I own a Personal Chef Business.  I work as a private chef for a family in Coral Gables. Before being a chef, I’m an artist, and food is the medium I choose to express my creativity. The colors, aromas and fresh produce inspire me and make me think of an empty plate as a blank canvas.

3. What is your favorite kitchen tool in creating your masterpieces/dishes?

Good quality sharp Knives. I love the German brand Wüsthof. There was a before and after in my life after getting a Vitamix. I like to have what’s necessary and not overload my kitchen with tools and gadgets I would rarely use. I appreciate working in a clean clear surface and being able to find what I need at the right time.

4. What is your sharpest sense out of all the 5 senses?

My sense of smell is sharp as my knives.

5. What advice would you offer for aspiring chefs?

Have fun, love what you do, be open to learn, learn from your mistakes and ALWAYS share your recipes, no one will make them as great as you do.

6. What is one culinary tip every chef should know and perfect?

Every chef should develop their own style in the kitchen, find what type of cuisine they are passionate about and work on it ‘til they master what they do.

7. What does good food mean to you?

When I taste love, dedication and effort in a dish, that’s the best nourishment I can get.

8. What features are important to you when selecting your chef outfit? 

Comfort, style, being able to move with ease and that the sleeves don’t touch the food!
Oh! And to be able to remove stains easily from the fabric. Messy days happen to the most experienced of us!

9. Favorite ingredient to work with?

Organic, local and cruelty-free foods. Good quality olive oils and special spices always make a regular dish stand out.

10. Favorite City to dine out in?

New York and Punta del Este.

11. Best Dish you have ever made?

I make a killer Shakshuka.

12. What you like to eat most often on your days off? 

On my days off, I like to keep it simple yet delicious, a good avocado toast with mushrooms and scrambled eggs or baked salmon with roasted veggies. I love prepping healthy foods I can grab on the go during the week such as herbed egg muffins and nutty granola!

13. Person you would most like to cook for? 

Enrique Iglesias and Gordon Ramsay

14. What made you decide to become a chef?

Since I was a child, I was inspired by the women in my family who are very skilled in the kitchen. My mother and both of my grandmothers are excellent cooks and my best teachers. I’m forever grateful to them for allowing me to find my passion.

Connect with our May Chef of the Month: 

Instagram: @dkpersonalchef

Facebook: @dkpersonalchef

Website: http://www.dayannekadosh.com/

APRIL 2019 CHEF OF THE MONTH OSCAR DEL RIVERO

 

osk-2019-head-shot-jhg-1.jpg

Get His Look

We have an exciting April Chef of the Month- Chef Oscar Del Rivero! Originally from Mexico City, Mexico, Chef Oscar is now an Executive Chef at Jaguar Hospitality Group and a Partner at both Jaguar Latin American Kitchen and Tavera Cocina Mexicana in Miami! Chef Oscar is extremely passionate about enhancing his dishes and brings fresh Latin American flavors with each bite. Read below to learn more about Chef Oscar’s Story!

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Where were you born?

Mexico City, Mexico. Colonia del Valle. It is a nice area inside the one of the biggest cities in the world. It was lovely growing up there, parks, markets, restaurants, subway system, and the feel of a busy city with a humble charm- but definitely fast-paced.

2. Where do you work and where are you based?

I am the Executive Chef at Jaguar Hospitality Group and Partner at Jaguar Latin American Kitchen and Partner at Talavera Cocina Mexicana.
http://www.jaguarhg.com/
https://www.instagram.com/oscardelrivero/

In 2005 Family and Friends got together to form Jaguar. My father has always loved the symbol of a Jaguar as an Aztec warrior and as a symbol of spiritual strength, as well as an icon for Latin America, since it is a Jaguar’s natural habitat. My partners and I created and developed Jaguar as a welcoming place where you can feel at home and eat food that reminds you of your roots if you are from Latin America. If you are not, Jaguar will represent with authenticity the flavors of South America for your enjoyment. It was and still is a beautiful project. Now after 13 years, it has matured into a neighborhood favorite and a spearhead of Latin American flavors, recipes and ingredients with respect to ancient and modern techniques. We as a group are really passionate about what we bring to Jaguar, with guest satisfaction at the top of the list and a thriving working environment full of challenges and goals. I love Jaguar in Coconut Grove, the rest of the restaurants I’ll tell you in the next interview…. They are amazing as well.

3. What is your favorite kitchen tool in creating your masterpieces/dishes?

My Mexican Spoon (peltre), of course I have favorite knives and special tongs. But I have grown fond of “the Spoon”.

4. What is your sharpest sense out of all the 5 senses?

It might be sight. That is why I love taking pictures of the dishes I make. I feel that I can learn a lot about a dish by just looking at it.

5. What advice would you offer for aspiring chefs?

Immerse yourself in everything food and absorb knowledge as fast as possible.

6. What is one culinary tip every chef should know and perfect?

Reading = Learning. So many culinary tips come to mind, but in my opinion, always reading and keeping up with evolution is key to learn a spectrum of culinary tips.

7. What does good food mean to you?

Fresh, wholesome, colorful, balanced and it needs to have nutritional value. Delicious goes without saying!

8. What features are important to you when selecting your chef outfit? 

Comfort, Durability and Design. I am known for splashing my jacket during service and I don’t mind. I believe that is what is for. Red sauce, guacamole and anything lurking in the kitchen can be a part of the design of my jacket. For that reason, it needs to be resistant to plenty of washes. Comfort in the kitchen is essential, lightweight and a smooth fabric is imperative. Now with so many different styles I think that “the chef” or “cook” can really express their personalities, not only in the dishes, but in the way they like to dress for creation and transformation.

9. Favorite ingredient to work with?

Lately, Ancient Grains, mostly amaranth and quinoa. At Jaguar we specialize in Latin American dishes and Quinoa and Amaranth are grains or cereals that have been used in Latin America since the ancient civilizations cultivated them. Not only do I have great respect for natural grain, also the techniques in which they can be cooked.

10. Favorite City to dine out in?

Miami, of course my restaurants are in this magical city. But I like diversity and the culture mix. From Cubans making tacos, to Mexicans doing sushi, the creativity never ends. It ranges from a taco stand or a food truck, to the most expensive and luxurious restaurants inside famous hotels and classics that only open 6 months of the year.

11. Best Dish you have ever made?

Braised Pork in Tomatillo Sauce over White Rice. In all my career I’ve invented and cooked many dishes. This one in particular is special because I cook this for my sons. They love this dish, and I love to cook it for them. I always try variations and they always rate it comparing it to original. Sometimes I add kim chi to my salsa verde and wait for their reaction when they try it. I have done it with mushroom puree in the sauce. It is fun for me and it is a dish that brings us together.

12. What you like to eat most often on your days off? 

Anything new. Always a new restaurant, or a new ingredient. I do have my favorite spots that I frequent. Following chefs and restaurants in social media is a great way to find the food I would like to try. This week was a clever version of Beef tartar and Yuca empanadas.

13. Person you would most like to cook for? 

Diana Kennedy in my mind is intimidating, but the more reason to try my best. It would be an honor to have her taste my dishes and hear her feedback.

14. What made you decide to become a chef?

The magic of transformation of ingredients. It was an eye-opening and satisfying experience.

Connect with our April Chef of the Month: 

Instagram: @oscardelrivero

Website: http://www.jaguarhg.com/

Chef Dakota Soifer’s Preserved Lemons

Preserved Lemons – Just what your pantry needs!

lemons


Chef Dakota Soifer has shared with us some of his favorite recipes.  See what special ingredient he always has on hand at his restaurant, Cafe Aion!

We love preserved lemons at Cafe Aion.  It is one of the most important ingredients that help make our identity.  The only tricky thing about them is that they take a long time (4-60 days) to properly cure. We usually make a 20lb batches every couple weeks!  For (most) home use a small amount will go a long way and if you get into the habit of making a batch every month or so, you won’t run the risk of being out.

You’ll need:

4 lemons

3/4c sugar

1 1/2c salt

1T coriander seeds

1 cinnamon stick

3 chili de arbol

1 Qt Ball jar

Directions:

Mix all the salt, sugar and spices together.  Cut the lemons almost into quarters, top to bottom, so that the four pieces are just connected at the tip.  Stuff each lemon with a big pinch of the salt mix and then put into the clean jar. After jamming all the lemons into the container pour any extra salt & seasonings in as well.  Then, with your hand or a wooden spoon press the lemons to begin releasing some of their juice.  Screw the top on and keep in a cool dark place for 2 months, turning the jar over every week or so.  Eventually the salt will pull out more and more of the lemon’s natural juices turning the packed salt into an intense brine, softening the lemons’ skins & introducing some of the spice’s flavors.  After 2 months, or as long as you can wait, take a lemon out, rinse it under cold water & discard the pulp.  Pull one of the quarters off and lay it skin side down.  With a sharp paring knife slice away as much of the white pith as you can.  The yellow peel is the good stuff, use it as bigger pieces in braises and roasts or chop it finely and sprinkle into grain-salads or atop a paella!

Enjoy!

An Interview with Sous Chef Brad Phillips

An Interview with Sous Chef Brad Phillips
Sous Chef at Harbor Beach Marriott Resort and Spa

Recipe Below: Seared Scallop with Coconut Forbidden Rice, Braised Mushroom and Ginger Coconut Sauce

Presented by: Chefuniforms.com

Originally from Ohio, Brad Phillips first became interested in food at a pretty early age. “My family and I would go to visit my grandparents in Dayton, Ohio, where my grandmother has an amazing organic garden. She did and still does grow anything from tomatoes, to cucumber, peppers, berries, asparagus, corn, zucchini, and green onions, just to name a few. Some of the best produce I’ve ever tasted.” Brad mentioned to me that his favorite time to cook was during the holidays, where the family would spend all day in the kitchen preparing meals.

Deciding to become a chef was an easy choice for Brad, because of his passion for cooking. So after attending a regular 4 year university and earning a degree in Business Management, Brad attended the
Culinary Institute of America and graduated with an AOS degree. Brad then moved to South Florida and got a hired at the 3030 Ocean restaurant located at the Marriott Harbor Beach Hotel in Fort Lauderdale. “I was trained by a great chef, Dean James Max, who after 2 years of working at 3030, asked if I would be his Sous Chef in his new restaurant, Latitude 41, in Columbus, Ohio. I jumped at the opportunity. Now I’m back at Harbor Beach as a Sous Chef overseeing all food and beverage outlets for the resort.”

The following interview provides insight into what it really takes to be a successful Sous Chef. Do not forget to check out the recipe he provides. It is simply delicious…Your comments are appreciated.

Questions:
Why did you want to become a chef?
As I got older, I really wanted to pick a career that I would be happy doing for the rest of my life. It became clear to me that cooking, menu writing, finding good produce, or just being around food made me the happiest.

What education would you recommend for aspiring chefs?
I would recommend to any aspiring chef to get some kind of culinary education even if it’s just part-time. I would also recommend some kind of business education if you are interested in opening your own restaurant some day.

What do you recommend for on the job training?
Find a restaurant that creates food that interests you. You’ll find that working in a place that does the kind of food your interested in will excite you even more about continuing your training. Always keep your eyes open in a kitchen. Try to pay attention to what everyone’s doing, and take a lot of notes.

Do you see any changes in food trends?
I think everyone is trying to be a little more health conscious these days. I’m seeing a lot less butter, cream, and fried foods. For me it’s a challenge to keep creating the foods that everyone loves, but without all the fat.

What is your greatest challenge in getting the ingredients you need?
It’s not always getting the ingredients you need; it’s getting the quality of the ingredients you need. My favorite way of cooking is keeping it simple. Using the freshest ingredients and preparing them in a way that you can taste the natural flavors of that product. If there not fresh, the customer will know.

Has the price of energy affected your industry?
I think the real affect is people not wanting to drive very far to eat a meal. I’m actually lucky to be in a good location that is easily accessible to customer so they don’t have to drive very far to the restaurant.

Do you see any dining trends within the US or abroad; including types of food today?
Cooking with organic ingredients is a very big thing right now and is something I like to do as much as possible. It’s an all natural way to grow or raise products and it’s great for the environment.

Do you see any dining trends surfacing for the future?
It would be nice to see a lot more organic products enter the market. I also think cooking with natural chemicals is going to be popular in the near future.

How much of the recipes you create is corporate and how much is your own?
Almost everything I make is my own. It makes the food I prepare more personal and to know that if the customer is happy that their enjoying something that I created.

What fabric and style of chef uniform do you enjoy wearing most?
To me, because I like to be on the line, cooking with my staff, I like to wear something light like Egyptian cotton. Something that keeps me cool in a hot kitchen.

What is your method of developing your sous chefs?
I want all my chefs to be as hands on as possible. Don’t worry about meetings or menus, just worry about the quality of the food production and the cleanliness of the kitchen.

Do you try to create a team spirit and environment with the kitchen staff? If so how do you accomplish it?
I try to surround myself and everyone else with a positive attitude. Every day I walk in the kitchen, I’m excited because every day is filled with new challenges. If I have a positive attitude, I expect my staff to also. When the staff is excited and happy, it directly affects the food and the service.

When preparing your menu do you consider health and try to prepare foods that are healthier?
Of course, the real challenge is to keep the flavors there while trying to keep the fat out.

Do you notice any resistance to unhealthy dishes?
Not really, everyone is different. Some people want to eat healthy and others just want what they want. As long as you give the customer a choice, everyone’s happy.

Do you enjoy dining out in your free time?
I love dining out. When you’re in the hospitality or service industry, it’s nice sometimes to be taken care of. It also gives me a chance to see what other chefs are doing and sometimes gives me ideas for my own menu.

Do you try to experience the food at your competitors? Do you ever get ideas from competitors?
It happens on occasion. It’s important to understand what the other restaurants are doing as well as the guests that are eating there. Sometimes you’ll walk away from a meal and say “wow, that was pretty good”, but the next day, you’ve got to try to do something better.

Do you think it is important to visit the markets rather than just have standard orders?
Especially when you’re new to the industry or maybe your opening a restaurant in a city or town that you’re not familiar with, I would definitely recommend visiting the markets or other purveyors to look at the quality of products you’ll be purchasing from them. It’s also good to pop in every once in a while to build a solid relationship with the people you buy your products from.

How do you test a new recipe without putting it on the permanent menu?
I will usually use my staff as guinea pigs first. When I’m playing with new recipes, I’ll make a dish for the staff and get their feedback first.

Do you pick the wines or is there a separate beverage manager?
I am a huge wine fanatic and so is my wife. Every time we drink wine, I’m always thinking how it would pair with a dish. Sometimes I’ll ask for help but for the most part I challenge myself to select the perfect wine.

If so does he try to pick wines that work well with the type of food that you prepare?
Some people don’t realize how important it is to select the right wine that pairs perfect with the food. Drinking the wrong wine with a meal could throw off the flavors that the chef was trying to create with the food.

What is your advice for planning a menu for a new restaurant?
Do research for the type of city or town you’re in. It’s important to understand what the people like in the location of your restaurant. Once you figure that out, you can tailor a menu that is personal to you but will also please the customer.

Could you please share a recipe with us?

Seared Scallop with Coconut Forbidden Rice, Braised Mushroom and Ginger Coconut Sauce

Serves 2
8ea. Scallop (dried pack U-10)
Season the scallops with extra-virgin olive oil, salt and pepper, and sear in hot pan until golden brown on one side. Turn scallops over and turn heat down to medium high. Add 1T. of butter. When other side has browned, remove from pan.

Sauté spinach and set aside for plating

Coconut Forbidden Rice
1c. Forbidden Rice
1c. Coconut Milk
1c. Water
1ea. Shallot (minced)
1T. Butter

In a hot pot, start with a little extra-virgin olive oil and sauté shallot until soft. Add the rice and stir for 30 seconds. Add you coconut milk and water with a pinch of salt. Bring to a boil, turn heat down to low and cover. Stir occasionally until rice becomes soft. When rice is soft, remove cover and fold in butter. Season to taste

Braised Mushroom
2lbs. Fresh Shitake Mushroom
¼ lb. Butter
3 stems Fresh Thyme
Salt and Pepper

Trim stem off mushroom and put in oven proof baking dish. Cut butter into smaller cubes and add to mushroom. Add thyme, salt and pepper. Cover with water just to top of mushroom. Place in oven uncovered for 30-40 minutes (or until mushroom is soft). Be sure to stir every 10 minutes. Remove from oven and pour off liquid just enough to keep mushroom moist. Check for seasoning.

Ginger Coconut Sauce
14 oz. can of coconut milk
¼ C. Heavy Cream
1 knob of Ginger (chopped)
1 Jalapeno Pepper (chopped, seeds removed)
¼ C. Sugar

Add all ingredients in a pan and bring to boil. Turn down to simmer and reduce until thickened.

Plating
Place 4 small spoons of rice in a row on plate. Next, place 4 small spoons of spinach of top of rice. Then the same with the mushroom. Top with scallops and drizzle sauce around plate. Finish with a light drizzle of extra-virgin olive oil on top of scallop.

Taste Chef Brad’s cooking at:
Harbor Beach Marriott Resort and Spa
3030 Holiday Dr.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33316
Reservations & Information: (954) 847-4770

Chef Brad will be our featured Chef on the cover of our Fall Catalog due to be mailed in September. Get your Free Chef Uniforms Catalog now.

If you are a Chef and would like to contribute to this blog with an article, interview, or experience, or be featured in our next Catalog, please contact us through the comments section below. We look forward to working with you.

This interview was provided exclusively by www.chefuniforms.com.

For a great selection of chef uniforms including discount chef coats, chef pants, non slip shoes, aprons and more please visit http://www.chefuniforms.com.

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